Genealogy by Martha

Cross - Love - Culpepper - Herron - Mordecai - Shelby - Cobb

Notes


Matches 1 to 50 of 2,054

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 #   Notes   Linked to 
1  Mordecai, John Howell (I3066)
 
2  Camp, Thomas II (I11692)
 
3  Campbell, James Newton (I11976)
 
4  Family F5813
 
5






 
Davis, Oliver Hazzard Perry (I4947)
 
6






 
Of Lusignan, Hugh XII (I7273)
 
7





 
Taylor, James Prevatte (I7762)
 
8




 
Crenshaw, Elizabeth Persillar (I90)
 
9




 
Love, James Clyde (I11442)
 
10




Reigned 844 - 859. 
Of the Scots and Picts, Constantine I (I8545)
 
11



Name: William Henry Graham
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 53
Birth Date: 9 Jul 1896
Birth Place: Goldsboro, North Carolina, United States
Death Date: 11 Nov 1949
Death Location: Charlotte, Mecklenburg
Father's name: Harrison Graham
Mother's name: Molly Isom
Residence: Charlotte, Mecklenburg, North Carolina 
Graham, William Henry (I9947)
 
12


Isabel married on May 12, 1240 to Robert de Bruce, Lord of Annandale
and they had a son: 
Of Clare, II Isabel (I7580)
 
13

 
Of Bavaria, Theodon III (I3363)
 
14

 
Clay, Mary Obedience (I4652)
 
15

 
Alexander, Martha H. (I10217)
 
16

 
Love, Robert A. (I11443)
 
17

+ 10 v. BALDWIN FITZ GILBERT, d. in 1154; m. ADELINE DE ROLLOS.
11 vi. MARGARET, d. after 1185. 
Of Clermont, Alice (I3294)
 
18

-- MERGED NOTE ------------


U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1700s-Current
Name: Evan Wilson Shelby
Birth Date: 26 Feb 1915
Death Date: 13 Apr 1986
Cemetery: Bethel Cemetery
Burial Place: Lauderdale County, Mississippi 
Shelby, Evan Wilson Sr. (I12025)
 
19

-- MERGED NOTE ------------


Web: Mississippi, Find A Grave Index, 1798-2012 Shelby
Name: Mary Ethel "mary" Estes Shelby
Birth Date: 16 Dec 1927
Age at Death: 66
Death Date: 27 Apr 1994
Burial Place: Neshoba County, Mississippi, USA

U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-Current
Name: Mary E. Shelby
SSN: 428-28-7199
Last Residence: 39350 Philadelphia, Neshoba, Mississippi, USA
BORN: 16 Dec 1927
Died: 27 Apr 1994
State (Year) SSN issued: Mississippi (Before 1951) 
Estes, Mary Ethel (I12020)
 
20

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

16. Jane ALEXANDER org 7 was born about 1665 in Raphoe, Donegal, Ulster,
Ireland. She died on 28 Mar 1692/93 in Manokin Hundred, Somerset Co.,
Md.
She was married to John MCKNITT Sr. (son of James\John MCKNITT and
Elizabeth WALLACE) about 1684 in Raphoe, Donegal, Ulster, Ireland. John
MCKNITT Sr. was born about Apr 1660 in Raphoe, Donegal, Ulster, Ireland.
He died on 23 Dec 1714 in Elk River Cecil Co., Md. Jane ALEXANDER org 7
and John MCKNITT Sr. had the following children:
+66i.Robert MCKNITT.
+67ii.John MCKNITT jr..
+68iii.Katherine MCKNITT.
+69iv.Mary MCKNITT. 
Alexander, Jane (I10083)
 
21

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Mary Shepher and Franklin were found in the household of Enoch and Nicey Edwards in the 1850 Montgomery Co., TN Census. 
Shepherd, Mary A. (I8869)
 
22

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Source of photos & data: Debbie Kaelin 
Daugherty, Benjamine (I7552)
 
23

1930 United States Federal Census about Tommie Bealle
Name: Tommie Bealle
Gender: Female
Birth Year: abt 1888
Birthplace: Georgia
Race: White
Home in 1930: Ozark, Dale, Alabama
Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Father's Birthplace: Georgia
Mother's Birthplace: Georgia
Household Members:
Name Age
Tommie Bealle 42
Tom S Bealle 17

Social Security Death Index
Name: Tommie Beall
Born: 1 May 1885
Last Benefit: 35064 Fairfield, Jefferson, Alabama, United States of America
Died: Mar 1978
State (Year) SSN issued: Alabama (Before 1951) 
Drewry, Tommie Eunice (I11044)
 
24

3089 i. John Hartwell Marable VI (Private).
3090 ii. Steven Gray Marable (Private).
3091 iii. Laura Gibson Marable (Private). 
Marable, V John Hartwell (I2593)
 
25

(Possible William & Mary's Catherine)
1881 Wales Census

Name: Catherine Mort
Age: 62
Estimated birth year: abt 1819
Relation: Boarder
Gender: Female
Where born: Swansea St Johns
Civil Parish: St John Near Swansea
County/Island: Glamorgan
Country: Wales
Street address: 2 Courtney St
Occupation: Working In Copper Works
Registration district: Swansea
Sub-registration district: Llangyfelach
ED, institution, or vessel: 11
Piece: 5355
Folio: 24
Page Number: 41
Household Members:
Name Age
Margaret Davies 56
John Davies 23
Joseph Davies 18
Elizabeth Ann Davies 10
Catherine Mort 62
 
Mordecai, Catherine (I7467)
 
26

1850 United States Federal Census about John McCutcheon
Name: John McCutcheon
Age: 53
Birth Year: abt 1797
Birthplace: Pennsylvania
Home in 1850: Ligonier, Westmoreland, Pennsylvania
Gender: Male
Family Number: 1
Household Members:
Name Age
John McCutcheon 53
Martha McCutcheon 47 (Margaret ?)
Elizabeth McCutcheon 28
Margaret McCutcheon 26
William McCutcheon 22
Anne McCutcheon 18 (Jane ?)
Jemima McCutcheon 15
Martha McCutcheon 11
J Wesley McCutcheon 13
Oliver G McCutcheon 9
Emily McCutcheon 7
Darby Killian 30
James Cunningham 28
John Reich 23


U.S., Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934
Name: John C McCutcheon
State Filed: Pennsylvania
Widow: Margaret Mccutcheon
Roll Number: T288_299 
McCutcheon, John (I11841)
 
27

1940 United States Federal Census
Name: James H Hargrove (James Henry Hargrove)
Age: 42
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1898
Gender: Male
Race: White
Birthplace: Alabama
Marital Status: Married
Relation to Head of House: Head
Home in 1940: Jefferson, Alabama
Farm: Yes
Inferred Residence in 1935: Jefferson, Alabama
Residence in 1935: Same House, Jefferson
Sheet Number: 2B
Number of Household in Order of Visitation: 34
Household Members:
Name Age
James H Hargrove 42
Lillian R Hargrove 35
William H Hargrove 7 (William Henry Hargrove) (b. abt. 1933)
Anna F Hargrove 3 (Anna Frances Hargrove) (b. abt 1937) 
Hargrove, James Henry (I9009)
 
28

From the History of Mecklenburg County: from 1740-1790 by John Brevard Alexander
Included in article re: to Governor Nathaniel Alexander, son of Colonel Moses Alexander, are references to Gov Alexander being one of the five sons of Moses Alexander. Gov Alexander, a physician by training, married Margaret Polk, a daughter of Col Thomas Polk and Susannah Spratt. Other sources say that Margaret was the granddaughter of Thomas Polk and that she was the daughter of Dr Ephraim Brevard.
Another son of Col Moses was William Alexander who married Elizabeth Henderson.
Information re: to birth and death of Governor Nathaniel Alexander and his wife Margaret Polk can also be found at www.findagrave.com. They are both buried in the Old Settlers Cemetery in Charlotte. Thomas Polk is sometimes cited as being "the founder" of Charlotte. He is buried in the Old Settlers Cemetery as well. 
Alexander, Col. Moses Jr. (I10164)
 
29

Robert Knox states in his October 1832 Revolutionary War Pension application that he was "born in the County of Dawn in Ireland in the year 1742"...he lived in " what was called Tryon County, now Lincoln County, when I entered the service and have lived in said county since the Revolutionary War and now live there."

(Source: Karen Knox Hayes to knox-dna ...
Group Number 1 FTDNA ID number: 27996:
"Our first record of Robert is in 1775. He purchased 160 acres on Killian
Creek in Tryon County, NC on 7 Oct 1775 from William King. (recorded in
Tryon Co Deeds p. 252-253) He then sold this land on 11 Jan 1785 (then in
Lincoln Co) to John Boggs (recorded in Lincoln Co Deeds p. 787)
[Note: Tryon County was formed from Mecklenburg County in 1768 and existed
until 1779. In 1779 Lincoln County was formed from Tryon County.]
In 1788 Robert purchased land from Robert and Margaret McKessick. (recorded
in Lincoln Co Conveyances, Book 3, p. 429)

Although the records list Robert Knox as serving in the militia at the
Battle of Kings Mountain, he stated himself in his 1832 pension application
that he was not at the battle. "I was in the service in the army that
marched against Ferguson and the Tories, to Kings Mountain, under Colonels
Graham and Johns(t)on, this time I cannot recollect but know I was not in
the battle at Kings Mountain, having been sent by Colonel Johnson upon some
business. I recollect joining the army commanded by General Green, near
Camden, and having being (been) placed out as sentinel the first night."
Robert Knox was granted a Revolutionary War Pension in 1833 at age 90
shortly before his death.

His Will was written March 13, 1830, and proved in court in 1833 at the
Lincoln Co., NC courthouse. (Will Book 1 p.288) Estate to be divided
amongst his wife Mary and seven of his children. Daughter Jane Knox Latta
received Five Dollars, but did not share in the division of the estate. Son
Robert and Daughter Agnes were not mentioned in the will; it is presumed
they had predeceased their father. Son William and Robert E. Bell were
Executors of the estate.

I descend from Robert's son James and can document most of James'
descendents to the present day. Many of his descendents remained in
Mecklenburg, Iredell and Lincoln Counties NC but some of them migrated to
Tennessee and Arkansas."

(Source of following information: Peggy Bruckner)
Robert Knox, lived on a part of Samuel Knox's property which was in York Co., SC. In the 1790 York Co., SC census, there is only one Knox listed and that is one Robert Knox. In the neighborhood where he was located were Lincoln County Pension Roll.

On the pension roll as late as 1834, more than fifty years after the Revolution, the following is the Lincoln County list of soldiers yet living and drawing pension: Robert Abernathy, Vincent Allen, Christian Arny, Matthew Armstrong, Robert Berry, Jonas Bradshaw, Caspar Bolick, Alexander Brevard, Samuel Caldwell, William Carroll, John Chittim, Michael Cline, Samuel Collins, Martin Coulter, Thomas Costner, George Dameron, Joseph Dixon, Peter Eddlemon, William Elmore, Samuel Espey, James Farewell, Abraham Forney, Robinson Goodwin, Joseph Graham, William Gregory, Nathan Gwaltney, Nicholas Hafner, Simon Hager, John
Harman, John Helm, James Henry, James Hill, John Kidd, John Kincaid, Robert Knox, Shadrack Lefcy, Tapley Mahannas, Marmaduke Maples, Samuel Martin, Thomas Mason, William Mayes, William McCarthy, William McLean, Nathan Mendenhall, Alexander Moore, John Moore, William Moore, Jeremiah Mundy, Humphrey Parker, Hiram Pendleton, Jacob Plonk, William Potter, William Rankin, Charlie Regan, Adam Reep, Joshua Roberts, James Robinson, Henry Rumfeldt, Peter Schrum, John Stamey, Bartholomew Thompson, Charles Thompson, Phillip Tillman, Conrad Tippong, Robert Tucker, John Turbyfill, Charles Whit, John Wilfong, Joseph Willis, James Wilkinson, and Elisha Withers.

The first documented record (I find) of my Robert Knox in North Carolina is his October 7, 1775 purchase of 160 acres on the "branches of Killian's Creek, adjacent to Ramsey's line." The land was purchased from William King of Tryon County and is recorded on pages 252-253 of Tryon County Deeds. Robert sold this same land on January 11, 1785, which was then Lincoln County, to John Boggs, as recorded in the Lincoln County Deeds, page 787. Tryon County was formed from Mecklenburg County in 1768. Tryon existed as a County from 1768 until 1779. Lincoln County was formed from Tryon County in 1779, during the American Revolution. In 1780, when he fought against the Tories in the American Revolution, Robert still owned his land on the branches of Killian's Creek. (Source: Peggy Bruckner)

Deeds of Lincoln County, North Carolina:
Book 26 Page 283 Samuel Fisher, Ezekiel Fisher, John Fisher, Richard Fisher, Jemimah Jones, Mary Sailor, Susanna Styles, Coheirs of Stephen Fisher Decd ? grantors; William Fisher ? grantee
Mentions: Robert Knox, widow Long, Reuben Simpson, Samuel Thompson, Stephen Fisher Senr, Frederick Harwell, Stephen Fisher Junr, Vardry McBee, CC
Book 37 Page 61 Richard Fisher - grantor; Archibald Fleming - grantee
Mentions: William Fisher, deceased; Robert Knox; Stephen G. Fisher; Frederick Harwell; M. W. Abernathy, CC

Robert Knox (1742-1833)
Analysis of Family Configuration versus Lincoln County NC Census Records (1790-1850)
Thesis:
John Knox, b. 22 May 1777, who m. Polly B. bef 1814, and d. 16 July 1860, Mecklenburg Co, NC., WAS NOT the son of Robert & Mary (Ewart) Knox.
He has been confused with another John Knox, b. 1798-1799, who m. (1) Margaret McElwee (2) Jane Bell (m. 1827, Lincoln Co, NC), who d. after 1880, Calhoun Co, MS, and who WAS likely the son of Robert & Mary (Ewart) Knox.
Analysis prepared November 2007 by Peggy Reece Bruckner, 3rd great-granddaughter of John and Polly B. Knox of Mecklenburg Co, NC. Family Configuration:
Robert Knox, b. 29 Sep 1742 , County Down, Ireland, d. 12 Jun 1833, Lincoln Co, NC
Mary (Ewart) b, 14 Jun 1756, Anson Co, NC, d. 7 Dec 1833, Lincoln Co, NC
m. bef. 1775 in Tryon Co, NC, probably
Children/Spouses: *
Jane, b. 1776 m. James Latta - 12 Apr 1796 - Lincoln
Margaret b. 1778 m. James E Bell - 05 Jan 1803 - Lincoln
Elizabeth b. 1780 m. Thomas H. McConnell - 15 Dec 1804 - Lincoln
Robert, b. 1782, never married (d. bef 1832)
William M, b. 1784 m. Ruth McConnell - 26 Mar 1806 – Lincoln
Rachel b. 1786 m. Robert Neel/Neal bef 1800 – Lincoln, probably
Mary Jr. b. 1789 m. Joseph Ramsey Ewart bef 1813 – Lincoln, probably
James, b.1791 m. Agnes/Nancy Cooper Miller bef 1817
Agnes, b. 1793 never married (d. bef 1832)**
Nancy, b. 1795 m. Robert Ewart Bell – Mar 1812**
John, b. 1798-1799, m. (1) Margaret McElwee bef 1826; (2) Jane Bell - 18 Sep 1827 – Lincoln
* About the Source Document: Robert and Mary’s children’s names and birthdates, with the exception of son John, come from a page handwritten by Mary (Knox) Ewart, and inserted into the Family Bible of William M. and Ruth (McConnell) Knox. William was the proven son of Robert and Mary.
On the right margin on this page, there are typewritten notes (placed on this 1980 copy by an unknown source) which give the names of the spouse, if any, for each child. At the bottom there is also a typewritten note which reads: “This omits the oldest son John, mentioned in the will, who is said to have married (1) and (2) Jane Bell”
Whoever added these typewritten notations has assumed that John was the oldest son, however, the early Lincoln County NC census records Do not support this assumption.
In addition, Robert’s March 1830 LWT named son, William Knox as Executor, probably because Robert Jr, the first-born son was apparently already deceased – making William Knox the eldest surviving son in March 1830. This explains why Robert left his Plantation to John, who would have been his youngest surviving son. The assumption being the youngest son would outlive his elderly mother, and care for her until her death -- which was a quite common practice at that time.
** Comment: it seems very strange to me that Robert and Mary named consecutive daughters Nancy and Agnes, which are essentially the same name, since one is a nickname for the other… that would be like naming one Peggy and the other Margaret…






 
Knox, Robert (I3580)
 
30

Social Security Death Index
about Carolyn L. Simpson
Name: Carolyn L. Simpson
Last Residence: 35173 Trussville, Jefferson, Alabama
Born: 14 May 1926
Died: 29 Aug 2010
State (Year) SSN issued: Alabama (Before 1951) 
Love, Carolyn Reid (I7502)
 
31

U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s
Name: George Gray
Birth Year: abt 1757
Arrival Year: 1767
Arrival Place: Charleston, South Carolina
Age: 10
Source Publication Code: 9077.7
Primary Immigrant: Gray, George
Annotation: Date and port of arrival.
Source Bibliography: Summerall, Geraldine Westberry. "List of Passengers That Arrived on the Ship Earl of Donegal ... Which Came into Port in Charleston, South Carolina, Dec. 22, 1767." In Huxford Genealogical Society Magazine (Homerville, GA), vol. 4:3 (Sept. 1977), pp. 702-707.

The Earl of Donagal Partial Ships Docket: (different George)
James Gray 1727 40 350 197
Jane Gray 1727 40 198
James Gray 1754 13 199
George Gray 1757 10 200
Elizabeth Gray 1760 7 201
Thomas Gray 1762 5 202
Robert Gray 1750 17 100 203 
Gray, George I (I12194)
 
32

U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-Current
Name: Ola E. Love
SSN: 418-22-9306
BORN: 21 Mar 1920
Died: 9 Apr 2002
State (Year) SSN issued: Alabama (Before 1951) 
LNU (Love), Ola E. (I1178)
 
33
 
Glascocke, Henry II (I153)
 
34
 
Herron, Adoline Willa (I636)
 
35
 
Wallace, Catherine (I1214)
 
36
 
Of Bavaria, Garibaldo I (I3365)
 
37
 
Robison, Martha (I10064)
 
38
 
Love, Frances Louise (I11465)
 
39
 
Campbell, Nathan P. M. (Mizzell?) (I11977)
 
40
Colonel William Ball 1615-1680 & Hannah Atherold - b: abt 1620-abt 1690)
Lost his estates under Cromwell persecution; immigrated to Virginia 1650 and built Millenbeck ; Presiding Magistrate of Lancaster Co. son of: Captain William Ball b: bet 1571-1590 in Wiltshire d: 1648 & Elizabeth Tuttle b: Abt. 1590 or Alice Waltham - daughter of: Richard Waltham son of: William Ball (Abt 1580-Abt 1650)
son of: John Paris Ball (Abt 1540-1628) & (1) Alice Haynes (Abt 1540-Abt 1580) (2) - Agnes Hathoway b: abt 1529 in England or Elizabeth Webb - daughter of: Thomas Webb & Anne Pulleyne (1512? - ?) - son of: William Richmond Webb (1468? - ?) & Dorothy Lymings son of: William Ball (Abt 1510-1550) & Margaret Moody b: 1509 in Workingham, Berkshire, England son of: Robert Ball b: abt 1475 in Barkham, Berkshire, Eng. & Margaret Unknown son of: Lord William Joseph Ball - Lord of the Manor of Barkham b: 1445 in Barkham, Berkshire, England & Elizabeth Celeter b: abt 1454 in Barkham, Berkshire, Eng
The surname"Ball" is probably a shortened form of "Baldwin" dating from Norman times meaning "one who is bold enough to win in battle".For many generations the Baldwins were Counts of Flanders. The shortened variations of the spelling included "Baell", "Ball",and Balle". John Balle, born 1263 in Norfolk County, England,is one of the earliest recorded but with very little information. The "Mad Preacher of Kent", John Ball, is the most recorded following John Balle. Having great disdain for royalty while preaching "equality among men" and believing no man had the right to set himself as master of others, he was beheaded by Richard II, King of England in 1381.

VA Genealogies by Rev. Horace Edwin Hayden, page 47, in the notes at
the bottom is stated:
"Mrs. Washington's grandfather, Col. William
Ball was the first of the family who came to VA., and settled near the
mouth of the Corotomon River. It appears from a memorandum of Joseph
Ball Esq., that he married in London, the 2nd day of July, 1638, a
Miss Hannah Atherall, by whom he had Richard who it is supposed died
an infant, as he is not mentioned in his father's Will; William born
2nd June 1641; Joseph born the 25th of May, 1649; and Hannah born
about the middle of March, 1650; but whether they were born in England
or Virginia, I cannot learn. William the 2nd son of the 1st of that
name married a Miss Williamson, an Englishwoman, by whom he had
William, Richard, James, Joseph, George, David, Margaret, Stretchley
and Samuel.
Joseph the 3rd son of the 1st William, married Miss Rogers by whom he
had Joseph, born the 11th of March 1684; Elizabeth who married the
Rev'd Mr. Carnegie; Hannah who married Mr. Travers; Anne who married
Col. Edwin Conway; & Easter (sic) who married Mr. Raleigh Chinn; he
afterwards married Mrs. Washington's mother, by whom he had her, and
soon afterward died. His Will is dated the 5th of June 1711."

William Ball of Lincoln’s Inn – living in 1634 – date of death unknown – 1 son, Col. Wm.

Col. William Ball was the Ball immigrant. He was the great
grandfather of George Washington. Almost all of these Virginia
ancestors were members of the House of Burgesses. William was a
member of the House of Burgesses, 1669-73

The majority of the earliest ancestors came to VA in the 1630-1650
era. The Balls were from Lancaster Co., VA. There are a great deal
of hand written land grants at Virginia Land Office Patents &
Grants/Northern Neck Grants & Surveys. Much can be found at the Mary
Ball Washington Library and St. Mary's White Chapel Church. They
consider Ball descendents to be royality.
(Source: Ted Kaufman, Dallas, TX 2002)

I went to Lancaster Co., VA, and the Mary Ball Library, in Oct. of
2003 and found much information on the Ball line. (MCM)

Sources:
"Colonel William Ball of Virginia, The Great-Grandfather of
Washington" by Earl L. W. Heck, published and sold by Sydney Wm.
Dutton, 103, Newgate Street, London, E. C.1. MCMXXVIII, (on file at
National Genealogical Society Library, 4527 17th Street North,
Arlington, VA)

"Colonial Virginians and Their Maryland Relatives", by Norma
Tucker (located at Montgomery County Historical Society, Rockville,
MD)
1. Colonel William Ball (1615) and Hannah Atherall (Atherold) Born
in England and educated in or about London. Evidence shows that he
was married July 2, 1638, to Miss Hannah Atherall or Atherold, the
daugher of Thomas Atherold. He probably left England soon after the
death of King Charles I., about 1650. He had studied law in England,
and later interpreted the principles of Common Law for fellow Virginia
colonists. He was a soldier "under Fairfax," and served in the Royal
Army and took part in the (English) Civil Wars,
remaining true to the royal standards and serving faithfully under the
banners of the ill-fated King Charles. He was probably present at the
battles of Naseby and Marston Moor. When the Royal Army was defeated,
Colonel Ball lost the greater part of his considerable estates. In
company with other royalists he fled to Virginia, the most loyal of
the king's possessions, and last to surrender to Cromwell's authority.
Colonel William Ball probably had a brother in Virginia. He did
not apply for a land grant until at least 8 years after arriving in
1650. It is thought that he was waiting out the bad times at home and
planned to return with the Stuarts were returned to the throne. He
seems, however, to have operated a vessel between England and Virginia
during this time. He first appears in the Colonial records as a
Merchant, probably a tobacco merchant.
After 1660, William Ball took an active part in the religious,
political and social life of Virginia. In 1660 he was a member of a
court to make a treaty with the Indians
and to establish a boundary for the occupation of land by the white
men. He first received the title of Colonel in 1672, the year he was
the County Lieutenant of Lancaster. If you held such a rank, you may
have earned is as a member of the General Court of Virginia.
"This august and aristocratic body was always composed of the class
known at that time as 'gentlemen,' men of wealth, family and
influence, and whose official station
added much to their influence. They, with the Governor, formed the
executive council, who dispensed the entire patronage of the colony in
the way of official appointment, at the same time that each individual
himself was himself commissioned 'Colonel' by royal authority...The
Governor was Lieutenant-General, the Councilors, Lieutenants of
Counties with the title of Colonel, and in counties where a Councillor
resided, some other person was appointed with
rank of Major." (Introduction to Vo. I. Calendar Papers, by Palmer)
It is probable that Colonel was not a member of the General Court,
since his name does not appear as a member of the General Court, but,
was a Colonel of Foot or Horse and not County Lieutenant. He was
doubtless Presiding Magistrate and Colonel Commander of the County.
He served on various committees in Lancaster County from 1675-7. He
was presiding member of various courts held in Lancaster County.
On March 28, 1675-6 he and Lieutenant-Colonel John Carter were
empowered by the General Assembly of Virginia to mobilize men and
horses to defend the colony against
Indians. Their leader was Nathaniel Bacon.
On August 14, 16777, he was present at a meeting to discuss taxes
being imposed by the General Assembly to put down Bacon's rebellion.
From 1670 until his death in 1680 he was a member of the Burgesses
of Lancaster County.
He eventually became a planter, and on January 18, 1663, received a
grant of land on Narrrow Neck Creek in Lancaster County. Four years
(apparently after promotion to
Major) he received a joint grant of 1600 acres in the Countyof
Rappahannock on the north side of the river of the same name together
with Thomas Chetwood. A few months later he
acquired 300 acres of rich bottom land adjoining the estate of Daniel
Fox, who later became the Colonel's son-in-law. He built a beautiful
Georgian mansion on his Lancaster
County estate, which he named Millenbeck, probably after ome place in
Warwickshire or Northamptonshire. The estate was held for four
successive generations by William Balls
and played a prominent part in Virginia history.
Colonel Ball was a zealous supporter of the Virginia branch of the
Church of England. He and John Washington were wardens of Christ
Church, Lancaster County.
(Taken from Heck's book)

Colonel William Ball (1615) and Hannah Atherall (Atherold)
Born in England and educated in or about London.
Evidence shows that he was married July 2, 1638, to Miss
Hannah Atherall or Atherold, the daugher of Thomas Atherold.
He probably left England soon after the death of King
Charles I., about 1650. He had studied law in England, and
later interpreted the principles of Common Law for fellow
Virginia colonists.
He was a soldier "under Fairfax," and served in the
Royal Army and took part in the (English) Civil Wars,
remaining true to the royal standards and serving
faithfully under the banners of the ill-fated King Charles.
He was probably present at the battles of Naseby and Marston
Moor. When the Royal Army was defeated, Colonel Ball lost
the greater part of his considerable estates. In company
with other royalists he fled to Virginia, the most loyal of
the king's possessions, and last to surrender to Cromwell's
authority.
Colonel William Ball probably had a brother in
Virginia. He did not apply for a land grant until at least
8 years after arriving in 1650. It is thought that he was
waiting out the bad times at home and planned to return with
the Stuarts were returned to the throne. He seems, however,
to have operated a vessel between England and Virginia
during this time. He first appears in the Colonial records
as a Merchant, probably a tobacco merchant.
After 1660, William Ball took an active part in the
religious, political and social life of Virginia. In 1660
he was a member of a court to make a treaty with the Indians
and to establish a boundary for the occupation of land by
the white men. He first received the title of Colonel in
1672, the year he was the County Lieutenant of Lancaster.
If you held such a rank, you may have earned is as a member
of the General Court of Virginia.
"This august and aristocratic body was always composed
of the class known at that time as 'gentlemen,' men of
wealth, family and influence, and whose official station
added much to their influence. They, with the Governor,
formed the executive council, who dispensed the entire
patronage of the colony in the way of official appointment,
at the same time that each individual himself was himself
commissioned 'Colonel' by royal authority...The Governor was
Lieutenant-General, the Councilors, Lieutenants of Counties
with the title of Colonel, and in counties where a
Councillor resided, some other person was appointed with
rank of Major." (Introduction to Vo. I. Calendar Papers, by
Palmer)
It is probable that Colonel was not a member of the
General Court, since his name does not appear as a member of
the General Court, but, was a Colonel of Foot or Horse and
not County Lieutenant. He was doubtless Presiding
Magistrate and Colonel Commander of the County. He served
on various committees in Lancaster County from 1675-7. He
was presiding member of various courts held in Lancaster
County.
On March 28, 1675-6 he and Lieutenant-Colonel John
Carter were empowered by the General Assembly of Virginia to
mobilize men and horses to defend the colony against
Indians. Their leader was Nathaniel Bacon.
On August 14, 16777, he was present at a meeting to
discuss taxes being imposed by the General Assembly to put
down Bacon's rebellion.
From 1670 until his death in 1680 he was a member of
the Burgesses of Lancaster County.
He eventually became a planter, and on January 18,
1663, received a grant of land on Narrrow Neck Creek in
Lancaster County. Four years (apparently after promotion to
Major) he received a joint grant of 1600 acres in the County
of Rappahannock on the north side of the river of the same
name together with Thomas Chetwood. A few months later he
acquired 300 acres of rich bottom land adjoining the estate
of Daniel Fox, who later became the Colonel's son-in-law.
He built a beautiful Georgian mansion on his Lancaster
County estate, which he named Millenbeck, probably after
some place in Warwickshire or Northamptonshire. The estate
was held for four successive generations by William Balls
and played a prominent part in Virginia history.
Colonel Ball was a zealous supporter of the Virginia
branch of the Church of England. He and John Washington
were wardens of Christ Church, Lancaster County.
(Taken from Heck's book)

Children of Col. William Ball (1615):
Captain William Ball (1/2/1641-9/30/1694) and Ms.
Williamson, Ms. Harris, Ms. Margaret Downman
Born in England, he inherited Millenbeck. Captain Ball took an active part in the public affairs of Virginia. In 1687 he was appointed to lay off the boundary between Lancaster and Northumberland Counties. He was a Justice in 1680 and at various times from 1682-1688 he was a Burgiss from Lancaster County. (Heck)






 
Ball, Col. William I (I132)
 
41
Joseph was born sometime between 1670 and 1680. His wife was named
Susannah, whom he married in either Nansemond or Surry County,
Virginia. Their children were Benjamin, Robert, and Joseph. Joseph
died in Northampton County, North Carolina in 1753.
(Source: http://64.235.34.221/rosehill/gencobb.htm) 
Cobb, Joseph * Sr. (I7890)
 
42
Patronymic surnames are based on the father’s given name. Generally, ap or ab was added between the child’s name and the father’s name. For example, David ab Owen is David "son of" Owen. For a woman’s name, the word ferch or verch (often abbreviated to vch), meaning "daughter of", was used. There were many exceptions to this:
The family could drop the 'ab' or 'ap'. In this case, his name would have been simply David Owen.
The family could drop the 'a' and attach the remaining 'p' or 'b' to the father’s name. For example, 'David ab Owen' could have been 'David Bowen'.
In dealing with patronymic names, remember:
The absence of 'ap' or 'ab' does not mean the family adopted a permanent surname. In south Wales particularly, patronymic surnames appeared without the 'ap' or 'ab'.
Different naming patterns were often used in the same family. For example, Harry John’s six sons were named Griffith ap Harry, John Parry, Harry Griffith, Richard Parry, Miles ap Harry, and Thomas Parry. They might equally have used the surname John(s) or Jones.
An illegitimate child may have used the given or surname of the reputed father, the surname of the mother, or the given or surname of the family who raised the child.
Some families used patronymics after adopting a permanent surname. Never assume that a surname is a permanent surname.
The father’s given name may be spelled differently as a surname even though it is pronounced the same (for example, Davies from David).
The name may have been anglicized.
Patronymic surnames changed with each generation.
A widow may have reverted to using her maiden surname.
Patronymic Name Surname
ab Ifan, ab Evan Bevan
ab Eynon Beynon
ap Harri, ap Harry Parry
ap Huw, ap Hugh Pugh
ab Hwfa Povah, Povey
ap Hywel, ap Howell Powell
ab Owain, ab Owen Bowen
ap Rhobyn, ap Robyn Probyn
ap Rhydderch Prydderch, Prytherch
ap Rhys Prees, Preece, Price
ap Richard Prichard, Pritchard
ap Robert Probert
ap Roger Prodger

This is just a quess-timation of how the later Mordecai's of this line came to be named Popkin. Earlier ap Hopkin was the "surname" before surnames became the established later name. This is how I imagine that "ap Hopkin" morphed itself into "Popkin". It is not a documentation. It gives me, and those researching this line, something to work with. (MCM -2002)

Because of patronymic naming customs, the International Genealogical Index lists Welsh entries under both given names and surnames. On the compact disc edition, you can also search for either a given name or a surname.
The International Genealogical Index for Wales can be difficult to use unless you understand a few points. The Welsh names in the International Genealogical Index have come from two main sources: a systematic extraction of the christenings, births, and marriages in church and chapel records and entries submitted by individual researchers. The Parish and Vital Records List is a list of the records and time periods that were systematically extracted. This list is available in print or microfiche formats at the Family History Library and in the Family History Centers.
Many Welsh people did not have surnames in much of the period covered by the International Genealogical Index. They used patronymics. Other families had established surnames. In 1813, the Established Church in Wales started using a standard, printed form for their parish registers, which included a column for surname. This made it relatively easy to determine if the family was using patronymics. Before that date, there wasn’t a surname column, so there was no way to determine if "William the son of John Thomas" would grow up to be "William John," "William Jones," "William Thomas," or by another name.
Welsh naming customs created a need to standardize the extraction of names for the International Genealogical Index. Before 1813, all births or christenings were extracted as a patronymic name, even though the family may have had an established surname.
Some entries in the early registers include a string of names, such as "Rachel daughter of Thomas John Charles of Glasgoed." These multiple names carry their owner’s genealogy, but create problems when trying to index them. The International Genealogical Index treats the first two names as the most important and discards the rest. In the example, Rachel would be listed as the daughter of Thomas John.
In an effort to help with these problems, the Wales International Genealogical Index has two indexes: the "given name index" and the "surname index." Most entries are indexed twice, once under a person’s surname and once under his or her given name. When doing a given name search, take into account that the Welsh and English equivalents for a given name were sometimes indexed together (Dafydd and David) and sometimes indexed separately (Griffith, Guto, and Griffin).

In order to compensate for the problems, follow these suggestions:
When searching for a specific baptism or birth after 1812, use the surname index. If you know that your ancestor used patronymics or came from an area where patronymics were still being used after 1812, you may need to search the given name index.
In the computer version, a parent search can be done only when the father’s surname is in all capital letters. The records extracted as patronymics prior to 1813 do not consider the father’s second name as a proper surname; therefore, the parent search will not work on most pre-1813 entries.
When searching for a specific baptism or birth before 1813, search the given name index, not the surname index. The index will list all children by the same name, such as William, listing them in order from the earliest date of baptism or birth to the most recent. You may use the surname index if you know your family was using patronymics and you know the father’s given name.
Search for a marriage under the surname of the bride or groom.
Search for all marriages after 1812 with a specific surname, as in a one-name study.
In summary, use the surname index (or surname search) for births and baptisms after 1813 and for marriage at all times, but use the given name index (given name search) for births and baptisms before 1813. Use the parent search on the computer version only when the father’s surname is in all capital letters. Always check the entries you find with the original record from which they were extracted.
Ancestral File. This file, part of FamilySearch™ at www.familysearch.org, contains family history information linked in family groups and pedigrees that have been contributed since 1979. Ancestral File contains thousands of Welsh families. It can print pedigree charts, family group records, and individual summary sheets for any person in the file.
Family Group Records Collection. Millions of family group record forms have been microfilmed in the Family Group Records Collection. These forms include many Welsh families. There are two major sections: the Archive Section and the Patrons Section. The film numbers for both sections are listed in the Author/Title Search of the Family History Library Catalog under: 
Mordecai\Mort, Hopkin (ap Thomas) (I12078)
 
43
Pharoah Cobbs was born sometime between 1635 and 1640 in Warrosquyoake
County, Virginia. On March 7, 1656 Pharoah sold his land in Isle of
Wight County and, with his mother, moved to Nansemond County,
Virginia. He died in Nansemond County in 1701.
(Source: http://64.235.34.221/rosehill/gencobb.htm)

Notes on Pharoah Cobbs:
ca Apr 1685 Richard Reynolds Jr. and wife Elizabeth and
brother-in-law George Williams, orphan of George Williams, receive the
estate of William Williams, decd. Pharaoh Cobb to produce the will.
[Isle of Wight Will & Deed Book 2, p243, according to
http://members.aol.com/vafdking/iowadd.htm]
Note: I did not check this item, but the referenced website lists
it among the missing items from Chapman’s abstracts. The page number
(if accurate) should put the recording date about April or May 1685.
“Estate” meant personal property, most likely livestock and household
goods in this case. We know most of this information from later
records, the main significance of this one being that it tells us
Richard Reynolds the younger was married to Elizabeth Williams by
1685, thus explaining the following record for February 1686.
George Williams, a tailor, had left a will in 1672 naming minor
children William, George, and Elizabeth, with Pharoah Cobb, Arthur
Smith and Henry Applewhaite overseers. [Isle of Wight Will & Deed Book
2, p114]. The will assigned all three children to guardians (implying
that all three children were under the age of 14 when the will was
written on 12 February 1671/2), with Elizabeth Williams assigned to
William Bressie. The estate was divided among the same three children
on 9 Jan 1673/4 by Richard Sharpe and Thomas Harris. [Ibid., p119]
William Williams, the son, later died and his share of the personal
estate was distributed to his brother and sister.
7 Feb 1693/4 Deed: Richard and Elizabeth Hutchins to
Richard Reynolds Jr. “Whereas Pharaoh Cobbs and Ann his wife by their
deed, dated 10 April 1671, confirmed to George Williams a tract of
land… which land was sold by Pharaoh Cobbs and Elizabeth, his mother,
to Saml. Haswell and is now in the possession of Richard Reynolds Jr.,
and Eliz. his wife the dau. of the said George Williams and lawful
inheritrix. Now, we Richard Hutchins and Eliz. his wife, the dau. of
Joseph Cobbs, Jr., decd. the eldest son of Joseph Cobbs, Sr., decd.
for 1000 lbs. tbco. sell to Richard Reynolds, Jr., and confirmed by
Richard Hutchins and wife Eliz. of Western Branch Nansemond.” [Isle of
Wight Deed Book 1, no page given, abstracted by Boddie p613] Hopkins’
abstract gives the land as 100 acres [Isle of Wight Deed Book 1, p90
abstracted by Hopkins]
Note: This is Richard Reynolds the younger, married to Elizabeth
Williams, daughter of George Williams Sr. These prior deeds are
among the missing records of the county. Richard and Elizabeth
Hutchins had also sold 130 acres to Arthur Smith adjoining Smith and
Pharaoh Cobb.
9 Dec 1699 Richard Reynolds, William Mayo, and Henry
Woodly witness to deed of Edward Cobb to Andrew Woodly. [Isle of
Wight Deed Book 1, p296 abstracted by Hopkins]
Note: There are several gaps in the records of both Isle of Wight
and Surry. Nearly forty years of early Isle of Wight deeds are
missing (1649-1688), and some wills and estate records from the late
1650s and early 1660s appear to be missing as well. Essentially all
the court records are also lost. Early Surry County wills are also
lost, apparently having been filed in James City County. The Surry
court records are missing from 1719 through late 1741. Other gaps in
the records are noted in the Chronologies if they appear to be
significant. (Source: "Notes on the Warrascoyack Plantation",
website of Bob Baird, http://www.genfiles.com/aboutbob.htm)









 
Cobb, Pharoah (I7900)
 
44
William Polk II had no Revolutionary War service as a soldier, being over age
50 when the war began. Some DAR applications have named William II
as having served n a supporting role in the Revolutionary War.
He married before 1750. No records have been found naming William
Polk's wives. There was a 90-100 year old female in the household of
Nancy Shelby in 1830, in Anson Co., NC. It is possible that she was
the widow of William. The last record found for William was in
Cabarrus Co., NC in 1802.

The Mecklenburg Signers... 'A William Polk may have married a Miss
Spratt, sister of Susan Spratt, wife of Thomas Polk, William's
brother.... Before 1745, when William was 17, he first married Miss
Spratt. About 1750, when William was 22, he married second, Catherine
Sterns, in North Carolina.'








 
Polk, William II (I4937)
 
45
James Tarpley apparently was a diligent farmer and kept to his business of farming and raising his family. From the birth places of the children he stayed in North Farnham Parish, Richmond Co, Virginia for most of his life. He was not involved in public life and seldom entered into any court proceedings.
Many documents of this region have been lost and we may never be able to prove conclusively that all questions of lineage and marriage have been answered.
I have always suspected a connection to the story of the Burton Church Bell in Williamstown. The James Tarpley of my line are related as cousins. It seems the donated bell, known as the Plantation Bell, to the Bruton Parish church in Williamsburg, Virginia was given by James Tarpley "a prominent merchant of Williamsburg," who "was the son of John Tarpley, of Williamsburng and Elizabeth Ripping, of York county, and grandson of Colonel John Tarpley, of Richmond county, and Anne Glasscock, his wife". [Tyler 336]
The record of Bruton Parish Church, by Rev. William Archer Rutherfoord Goodwin, D. D. LL. D. , page 16, states:
"The outside of the church also received some attention at this time (1755). The steeple on the brick tower was erected in place of one which was beyond further repair, and arrangements were made to have a belfry in it. This was soon followed by the fit of a bronze bell with this inscription on it: "The gift of James Tarpley to Bruton Parish, 1761," This bell is still in use. It is sometimes spoken of as the "Liberty Bell of Virginia," as it rang out proclaiming the passage of the Declaration of Rights in the House of Burgesses on May 15, 1776."
Additionally it may have also rung out the repeal of the Stamp Act in 1766 and the adoption of the first complete act of sovereignty by any of the colonies, May 15, 1776, six weeks ahead of the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia. On October 19, 1781, it celebrated the surrender of Lord Cornwallis and later the peace with Great Britain.
The Bell in the tower is engraved: " The Gift of James Tarpley to Bruton Parish, 1761." In 1766 it celebrated the repeal of the Stamp Act. On May the 15th, it celebrated the passing of a resolution by the House of Burgesses to establish a State Constitution and Declaration of Rights, and to instruct the Virginia Delegates in Congress to offer a resolution to declare the united Colonies free and independent states. In 1783 it celebrated the ratification of the Treaty of Peace between the the United States and Great Britain."
(Mann pp. 11 - 13

The Farnham Parish records used here to build this family apparently had been recopied from much older sources according to the editor, Judith McGhan. She thinks that it was probably a very dilapidated record of nothing more than loose pages. When it was copied any previous date sequence and catagories were lost such as births, deaths, marriages and perhaps more information. It is presently in the county clerk's office in Warsaw, Virginia. One of the things that is interesting about this record is that it also contains many of the associated families that the Tarpleys marry into from 1673 to 1781. You see here Davenport, Glascock, Peachey, Webb, Griffin, Barber and a few others. Notably absent are the Camp and Oldham families. (McGhan)

The documentation of this family is based largely on the work of Judge Zelma Wells Price in her book on her ancestry, Of Whom I Came, From Whence I Came published in 1963. She claimed to have had good family sources for the make-up of this family and its history in terms of the marriages of the Camp women to Tarpley men. This information has been lost to researchers but the birth dates listed are very specific that I believe they came from a bible reference and verified by the Farnham Parish register. This source needs to be found to prevent the on-going arguments that this James Tarpley may have married Mary Oldham. In extracts from North Farnham Parish register in Richmond County we do find a Mary Oldham born to John and Sarah Oldham on June 25, 1712, however, no marriages are listed for any Oldham or Tarpley. (McGhan pp. 434 - 459) 
Tarpley, James II (I11701)
 
46
United States Census, 1850
Name: D Alexander
Residence: Cabarrus county, Cabarrus, North Carolina
Age: 63 years
Calculated Birth Year: 1787
Birthplace: North Carolina
Gender: Male
Race (original):
Race (expanded):
Death Month:
Death Year:
Film Number: 18108
Digital GS Number: 4189785
Image Number: 00563
Line Number: 3
Dwelling House Number: 1009
Family Number: 1009
Marital Status:
Free or Slave:
Household Gender Age
D Alexander M 63y
Harriet C Alexander F 48y
Terrissa H Alexander F 28y
Mary A Alexander F 28y
Hettey G Alexander F 21y
Harriet C Alexander F 16y
F M Alexander F 13y
Daniel L Alexander M 10y
Nelson Carrigan M 6y 
Alexander, Mary (I10243)
 
47
The true birthdate of Joseph Alexander is unknown. He died on 9 Mar 1729/30 in New Munster, Cecil Co.,MD. He is thought to have married Abigail McKnitt daughter of James (John) McKnitt and Elizabeth Wallace, in 1686 in Somerset Co., MD. Abigail McKnitt was possibly born about 1667 in Stirling, Scotland. She died before 1726 in Cecil Co., MD.
Joseph was doubtless married twice, but the names of his wives are not of record. Tradition give the name of his first wife as Abigall McKnight (McKnite, McKnitt, Mcknitt), sister of John McKnight of Somerset and Cecil Co. His second wife may have been a Widow Alexander; in fact she may have been the wife of Andrew Alexander of Somerset who probably died comparatively young. Possibly she was a sister of Abigall McKnight.

Joseph Alexander, Tanner and Abigail McKnitt had the
following children:
1. Capt. James Robert Alexander, Tanner & Signer.
2. Sophia Alexander
3. Jane Mackey (Muley) Alexander
4. Abigail Clapham (Closson) Alexander
5. Francis Alexander
He was married to Jane McKnitt (daughter of James\John McKnitt and
Elizabeth Wallace) about 1700 in New Munster, Cecil Co.,MD. Jane
McKnitt was born about 1653 in Manokin Hundred, Somerset Co., MD She
died after 1730 in Cecil Co., MD.

(Source: http://ralphinla.rootsweb.ancestry.com/alxnmdcb.htm#i10261)
I. Father of Joseph, James & Francis. Alexander birth date unknown.
Father of J. J. F. Alexander had the following children:
1. Joseph Alexander
2. James Alexander
3. Francis Alexander
Note: In James Alexander's will, written July 12, 1717 in New Munster, Cecil Co, MD, Francis was named as his brother and executor.

II. Joseph Alexander (Father of Cecil Co., Alexander's) birth date unknown.
On February 10, 1718/9 a tract of land of 184 acres in New Munster, Cecil Co., MD was conveyed to Joseph Alexander and his son James by Thomas Stevenson of PA. Joseph Alexander, Tanner, wrote his will December 13, 1726 in New Munster, Cecil Co., MD. Joseph's estate was probated March 9, 1730 in Cecil Co., MD.

wife 1: Joseph Alexander & Abigail McKnitt had the following children:
1. Francis Alexander. In Joseph Alexander's will written December 13, 1726 in New Munster, Cecil Co, MD, Francis was named as his son.
2. Sophia Alexander. In Joseph Alexander's will written December 13, 1726 in New Munster, Cecil Co, MD, Sophia was named as his daughter.
3. James Alexander was born around 1693.
4. Jane Alexander was born probably before 1705. She married Mr. Muley. Muley was born probably before 1705.
In Joseph Alexander's will written December 13, 1726 in New Munster, Cecil Co., MD, Jane Alexander was named as his daughter
5. Abigail Alexander was born probably before 1705. She married Mr. Clapan.
In Joseph Alexander's will written December 13, 1726 in New Munster, Cecil Co., MD, Abigail Alexander was named as his daughter.

wife 2: Joseph Alexander, Tanner and Jane McKnitt had the following children:
1. Abraham Alexander was born before 1728 in MD

U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900
Name: Joseph Alexander
Gender: Male
Spouse Name: Abigail Mcknitt
Spouse Birth Year: 1660
Marriage Year: 1686
Number Pages: 1

Millennium File
Name: Joseph Alexander
Spouse: Abigail Mc Knitt
Birth Date: 1660
Birth City: Raphoe
Birth County: Ulster
Birth Country: Ireland
Death Date: 1730
Death County: Cecil
Death State: Maryland
Death Country: USA
Parents: James Alexander
Children: James Alexander
Sophia Alexander
Francis Alexander
Jane Alexander

Family Data Collection - Deaths
Name: Joseph Alexander
Death Date: 9 Mar 1729
City: Cecil
State: MD
Country: USA

Foote’s 'History of North Carolina':
Says that there were seven Alexander brothers and their widowed mother who, because of the persecution leading up to the revolution of 1688, decided to come to America where they could live and worship in peace. So, they migrated from Ireland to the eastern shore of MD.
They brought their minister from Scotland to bless the voyage and administer communion. When all was ready and the families were on board the ship, a company of English soldiers boarded, broke up the meeting and arrested their minister taking him to jail. According to Foote, all were distressed over the plight of the minister, and no one knew just what to do. Finally, an aged woman who had been covenanting all day for her grandchildren, made the suggestion that they wait until nightfall, raid the jail, liberate the minister, and take him to America with them. Following her plan, just before dawn, all were aboard including the minister and the ship was set out to sea. He, with the rest, were on their way to America.
When the group reached America they joined a settlement of Scots already in Somerset Co., MD. They later migrated on to Cecil Co., MD settling at the head of the Chesapeake Bay on the tributary of the Elk River just across from New Castle settlement in Delaware. This property at the head of Chesapeake Bay had been
in dispute for many years as it had been claimed by MD and by PA.
Ultimately, the certificate for the settlement of the 'New Munster' tract in the New Ireland Colony was issued by George Talbot in 1863 in these words: "Surveyed for Edwin O’Dwire and fifteen other Irishmen by virtue of warrant from his Lordship, August 7, 1683 … a certain tract of land called 'New Munster' lying and being in the County of Cecil … on the main fresh of the Big Elk … containing 6,000 acres more or less …. "
(embellished hereon by MCM - 2003)
George Talbot was a cousin of Cecil Calvert who was the Third Lord of Baltimore. This land had been a part of an ideal dream project for the founding of Talbot's New Ireland County. He had come from Co. Roscomon, Ireland and joined the MD colony in 1680.
Previous to his arrival, in 1632, Charles I of England granted the MD colony to his cousin, Lord Baltimore (Cecil Calvert). Unfortunately later, in 1681, Charles II, who was indebted to William Penn's father, Admiral William Penn, paid his debt to the Admiral (who was since deceased) by awarding his son, William Jr., what he thought was worthless land. In 1683, Charles II also gave to William Penn land on the 'Delmarva Peninsula', which today includes the eastern portion of modern MD and all of Delaware. The original 'worthless land', given by Charles II to William Penn, has now become PA.
This issue did not find resolution until Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon were hired to come to America in November of 1763 to measure and define the boundaries between PA and MD. Fifty years later the boundary was legalized. During the American Civil War, this boundary morphed itself in the dividing line between two 'countries', the North and the South. Now, the Southern States are referred to as 'Land of Dixie', because of the contribution made by Jeremiah Dixon.

The Cecil County, Maryland, records (Deed Book 2, J.D., 2 pg 28, 81,
82, 83) From Thomas Stevenson and his wife, Sarah, of part
of this tract called 'New Munster' to a group of Alexander's who were
led into the colony by Matthew Wallace. The deed says that the land
had originally been granted to Edwin O’Dwire and others. Those
purchasing from Stevenson were:
Matthew Wallace
James Alexander, farmer
Arthus Alexander, weaver
David Alexander, weaver
Joseph Alexander, tanner, and his son, James
James Alexander, weaver, and his son Moses
This deed speaks of Matthew Wallace and 'his company,' indicating that
Matthew Wallace, whom the records show have been living in Somerset Co., MD, on the eastern shore, led this company into Cecil Co. to settle on the New
Munster tract.
The first deed was a ?ase (lease) deed dated 1714, and set forth that the settlers had been on this land for some years, as the improvements which they had made were taken into consideration of the price. It seems that the migration occurred much earlier because Matthew Wallace gave Power of Attorney to, William Alexander back in Somerset in 1707 to sell his land there.
The Alexander's who came with him were most probably some of the
seven brothers, or their sons, mentioned by Foote.

Ross McKendrick states:
"To Mecklenburg County, N.C., a great wave of Scotch-Irish migration
flowed directly from New Munster in Cecil County, Maryland, through
the Shenandoah Valley. Numerous descendants of George Talbot’s tract
had brought their families and taken up lands (in North Carolina)
prior to 1732. Wills of certain Alexander's of New Munster, indicate
that this family was strongly represented in the North Carolina
settlement. The importance of Maryland’s part in the settlement of N.
C. may be drawn from the story of the famous Mecklenburg Convention of
May 31, 1775 ----of the seven signers, more than half may be directly
traced to Cecil County, Maryland, and adjacent settlements. This
action (The Mecklenburg Resolves) anticipated more than a year before
the actual Declaration of Independence by Congress, and reflected the
spirit which emigrated from George Talbot’s County of New Ireland. The
Maryland immigrants to North Carolina only made great asserveration of
purpose, but were to be found in the thick of the flight at King’s
Mountain …. "

Alexander, Joseph, tanner, New Munster,Cecil Co., 13 Dec 1726;
probated after 9th March, 1730.
To son-in-law Elias Alexander, bond, dated 19th Aug., 1718, assigned to testator by Sarah Steven, except so much as is already pd., and 40s. to dau. Sophiah.
To son Francis, 20s.
To daus. Jane Muley and Abigail Clapan, 10s. each.
To son James, ex., residue of estate.
Test: Owen O'Donnell, Anne Taylor, John Dail, John Mc-Knight (Macknite). 20, 235.



 
Alexander, Joseph (the Tanner) (I8324)
 
48
"Dorcas Shelby and William Kerr came to TN about 1828-1830 and settled
at Raleigh or 'Union Station', as it was then known, where they lived
and died." (Source: Lineage and Tradition of the Family of John
Springs III, by Caroline Isabel Poole Jones) 
Shelby, Dorcus (I291)
 
49
"Harriet Shelby and Alanson Alexander had no children. They lived and
died at Rocky River, North Carolina. Mr. Alexander was noted for his
long prayers at service. He was deliberate and quiet in manner. Mrs.
Alexander visited her relatives in Tennessee before her death. Harriet
Shelby (with her husband and other members of the Shelby and Alexander
families) is buried in Sugar Creek Cemetery, near Charlotte, North
Carolina." (Source:"Lineage and Tradition of the Family of John
Springs III" by Caroline Isabel Poole Jones)

Also from the same book: "A daguerreotype of Harriet Shelby Alexander
and her husband are valued treasures of Mrs. John Rawls Jones of
Tupelo, MS. Mrs. Jones also has a daguerreotype of her great
grandparents, William Taylor and Mary Shelby Alexander."
 
Shelby, Harriet C. (I491)
 
50
"It must be said, however, that given the lapse of time between
Merfyn's life and the composition of the pedigree in HG (Harleian
Genealogies), that the connexion via Essyllt ferch Cynan, must at best
be regarded as tradition and may be simple fiction. . . supposed
blood-links to the ancient ruling lines of other kingdoms supplied
later members of the line of Merfyn with a superficial layer of
legitimacy in their attempts to dominate and intrude into neighbouring
kingdoms."

Merfyn's descent on his father's side is traced (Jesus College MS 20)
back, via the legendary late 6th/early 7th century bard Llywarch Hen,
who is associated with Powys (and who, incidentally, was at one time
thought to be the author of the 'Canu Heledd'), along a branch of the
line associated with the erstwhile kingdom of Rheged (north-west
England), to Coel Hen. Further, tradition has it that Merfyn came
"from the land of manaw". That could refer to either Manau Gododdin or
The Isle of Man. Merfyn's father was Gwriad. An inscribed stone on the
Isle of Man, which could date from the 9th century, reads "crux
guriat" (cross of Guriat). Guriat is usually identified with Gwriad.

At any rate, when Merfyn died (844), he was succeeded by his son
Rhodri. According to the genealogies in Jesus College MS 20, Rhodri's
mother was Nest of Powys, sister of Cyngen, king of Powys.

Cyngen is the Concenn who erected Eliseg's Pillar, in memory of his
great-grandfather, Eliseg (Elisedd). Elisedd would probably have been
a contemporary of the powerful Mercian king, Offa (757-796). The
pillar commemorates Elisedd's reclamation of Powysian territory from
the English, and the 'Annales Cambriae' record several campaigns
against the Welsh by Offa. At some point, Offa seems to have decided
that there should be no doubt where the border between the English and
the Welsh lay, and the massive earthwork, known as Offa's Dyke was
constructed. Whether Offa's Dyke was more symbolic than truly
defensive is the subject of debate. Even if it prevented Welsh
incursions into England, it certainly it didn't prevent English
incursions into Wales. 'Annales Cambriae' (822): "The fortress of
Degannwy (Gwynedd) is destroyed by the Saxons and they took the
kingdom of Powys into their own control."

Cyngen died in 854, possibly having been forced into exile by Rhodri.
Powys was subsequently annexed by Gwynedd. How this takeover was
achieved is not recorded, but Powys was ruled as a subsidiary of
Gwynedd until the late 11th century. In 853, the 'Annales Cambriae'
had noted:

"Mon (Anglesey) laid waste by black gentiles."

The phrase "black gentiles" (and variations thereof, e.g. dark
heathens, dark foreigners) means Danish, rather than Norwegian (fair
heathens, fair-haired foreigners), Vikings. The first recorded Viking
attack on Wales actually appears in the 'Annales' three years
previously (i.e. in 850). They were responsible for the killing of one
Cyngen, whose provenance is unknown.

In 856, however, as recorded by the 'Annals of Ulster', Rhodri won a
famous victory against them:

"Horm (Gorm), chief of the dark foreigners, was killed by Rhodri son
of Merfyn, king of Wales."

The 'Annals of Ulster' also provide a reminder that the Vikings
weren't the only external threat that Rhodri had to contend with
(865):

"The Britons were driven from their land by the Saxons (presumably
Mercians) and were placed in bondage in Móin Chonáin (Anglesey)."

Nevertheless, Rhodri's empire building activities continued. Jesus
College MS 20 shows him married to Angharad, sister of Gwgon of
Ceredigion. Gwgon drowned ('Annales Cambriae' - the circumstances are
unrecorded), in 872, and control of Ceredigion was subsequently
acquired by Gwynedd.

Ceredigion is still the term used in 9th century annals, but later
tradition has it that (in the late 7th century) Seisyll, the king of
Ceredigion, added the territory of Ystrad Tywi (literally 'Vale of
Towy' - to the south of Ceredigion), and that the enlarged kingdom was
thenceforth called Seisyllwg in his honour.

In 877, however, the 'Annals of Ulster' note that:

"Rhodri son of Merfyn, king of the Britons, came in flight from the
dark foreigners to Ireland."

And a year later (878):

"Rhodri son of Merfyn, king of the Britons, was killed by the Saxons." 
Of Gwynedd (Wales), Essylt ferch Cynan (I6098)
 

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