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Telemacus Alexander

Male 1795 - 1842  (47 years)


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  • Name Telemacus Alexander 
    Born 1 Sep 1795  Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 17 Oct 1842  Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I10172  MyTree
    Last Modified 24 Jun 2014 

    Father Silas Alexander, Sr.,   b. 1 Jan 1759, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Oct 1831, McAlpine Creek, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years) 
    Mother Mary Ann MNU,   b. 1764,   d. 12 Oct 1833, Mecklenburg Co., N.C. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years) 
    Married 1790  Mecklenburg Co, NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F4378  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Hannah Smith,   d. 1846, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married Abt 1819  Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Jane Rankin Alexander,   b. 20 Mar 1820, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jul 1892, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     2. Martha H. Alexander,   b. 22 Sep 1822, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    +3. James Wallace Alexander,   b. 24 Sep 1824, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Aug 1863, Charlottesville, Albermarle, VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 38 years)
    +4. Oswald Alexander,   b. 4 Dec 1825, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Dec 1915, Pineville, Mecklenburg Co, NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)
    +5. John Smith Alexander,   b. 22 Dec 1826, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Nov 1904, Moore Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
    +6. Silas Washington Alexander,   b. 22 Dec 1826, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Mar 1891, Crab Orchard, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
    +7. William Newton Alexander,   b. 28 Mar 1828, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Aug 1905, Sharon, Mecklenburg Co., N.C. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
     8. Prudence Alexander,   b. 21 Oct 1831, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jul 1896, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)
     9. Ulysses Columbus Alexander,   b. Sep 1833, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jun 1865 (Civil War), Newport News, VA Find all individuals with events at this location
     10. Mary Steele Alexander,   b. Jun 1837, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 17 Jul 2017 
    Family ID F5486  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsDied - 17 Oct 1842 - Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 

    • Telemacus (Telemachus, Telemarcus) Alexander was born September 1, 1795, the second child of Silas and Mary Alexander of McAlpine Creek in Mecklenburg County. He had six brothers and two sisters. His grandparents were Hezekiah and Mary Sample Alexander, remembered for their construction of a lasting stone house and for Hezekiah's political activities during the American Revolution.1
      Telemacus was undoubtedly educated as other boys from Mecklenburg families of "Scotch-Irish" origin were in the days when the United States was a new country. His teacher would have been Reverend James Wallis, minister of Providence Presbyterian Church and principal of Providence Academy,2 which was described as a "classical school."3 Latin and Greek language and literature were an essential part of a proper education in early America. Silas named his second child for a character in an ancient Greek story called The Odyssey, by Homer. He was the son of King Odysseus, and he helped his father defeat his rivals.4

      Military Service
      As a young man, Telemacus served in the War of 1812 in the Second Regiment of the Mecklenburg County Detached Militia in 1814, under Major General Montford Stokes.5
      Marriage, Children, and Community Sharon Presbyterian Church, Mecklenburg County NC:
      Telemacus married Hannah Smith around 1819, when he was 24 years old. The 1820 census shows Tellemarcus (sic) Alexander living in Mecklenburg County in a household of four persons, one of whom, presumably him, as head of household, is listed as "engaged in agriculture." One free white female between 16 and 26 years of age, presumably his wife Hannah, is listed, which would place her birth date between 1794 and 1804. One female under 10 is listed, who could be their daughter, Jane, who was born in the census year.
      One male slave between 14 and 26 years old is listed in the household in 1820, as well.6 In the tax lists for 1823 and 1824, white men between the ages of 21 and 50 are listed by the militia company to which they belong. Telemacus is listed under Captain Stephen Manson, with 44 acres of land, and in 1824, one black person between the ages of 12 and 50.7
      The ages, genders, and number of Telemacus and Hannah's children in 1830 correspond exactly to those of "Marcus Alexander" listed in the 1830 census, below Silas, Hezekiah, and William, Telemacus's brothers who lived near him. Marcus S. Alexander appears higher up the page. If this is another misspelling of Telemacus's name, it indicates that the family still resided in the Sharon community, consistent with church records, and that they no longer owned slaves.8
      Telemacus served jury duty on a regular basis between 1826 and 1840.9 Court was held for one week beginning on the fourth Monday in February, May, August, and November. Wills and deeds were executed then, as well as criminal and civil trials.10 The court records show that in 1830, Telemacus and Hannah sold land to William Sample.11 In 1837, Telemacus and Isaac Campbell sold 60 acres to Elam Harrison, and in 1838, Telemacus and his wife sold land to Richard Tradinick.12 In addition, in 1830, Alexander Wallace and his wife Prudence sold 44 1/2 acres on McAlpine Creek, which were described as adjacent to James Willson (sic) and Hannah (Smith) Alexander.13 Earlier, in 1825, a Margaret Smith sold 25 acres on the north side of McAlpine Creek to James Wilson. The deed was witnessed by Telemacus Alexander and Keziah Alexander.14 Telemacus had a sister named Keziah. (His Aunt Keziah died circa 1821.)15
      The 1840 census lists Telemacus Alexander with a household of 12 persons. One person is still counted as employed in agriculture, and no slaves are listed.16
      Telemacus is listed as a farmer in census records.17 Hannah bore a child about every two years beginning in 1820.18 The whole family were members of Sharon Presbyterian Church, where Telemacus was ordained as a ruling elder in August of 1839.19 Their farm was apparently located near the church, and the family's names appear repeatedly in the churches' records.20 They raised sheep and there was a loom in their household, which most likely was used by Hannah to produce cloth for clothing and household furnishings. Telemacus owned blacksmith tools, which he may have used to earn income as well as to repair tools and wagons on the farm. In 1842 they had planks, bricks, and shingles which may have been intended for a house for the family. They were in their forties, had eleven children, a substantial number of loans and outstanding debts, and a cotton crop in the field,21 when Telemacus suddenly died.

      Obituary from The Charlotte Journal
      An obituary in the Charlotte Journal states pathetically that Telemacus left "a wife and eleven children, most of them small, to mourn a loss to them irreparable." 22 The youngest of the ten known children, Mary, was five years old, and the eleventh child must have been an infant.
      Estate records show that he died leaving a number of debts that had to be settled. Most of the livestock and all the tools were sold, along with the household furniture, the loom, and the building materials. As a widow's allowance for one year's support, Hannah was allowed to keep one cow; one heifer; five head of sheep; five shoats (young hogs or pigs); 200 bushels of corn; fodder, shucks, and straw; five head of hogs; 10 pounds of wool; and one lot of leather. Telemacus's brother Silas settled the estate.23
      Less than two years later, in April of 1844, C. T. Alexander was appointed temporary guardian of seven of the children, and one year later, Silas was appointed guardian of "the infant heirs of Telemachus Alexander, indicating that Hannah was incapacitated.24
      Hannah's burden of misfortune during this period may have included the death of a child. The 1840 census lists ten children, while her husband's obituary mentions eleven. Sharon Church records show the death of Hannah Alexander occuring only four years after her husband, on December 5, 1846.25
      In the 1850 Census, under Providence District of Mecklenburg County, nine of the children are listed as living together on a farm without their parents. The Providence district included the area around Sharon Presbyterian Church, which at that time was outside the town of Charlotte. James Wallace, who was 26 years old, the twins, who were 24, and William, who was 22, were listed as farmers by occupation, on a farm which they owned, with a value of $500.26 The oldest daughter, Jane, was about thirty years old and was married and living with her husband.27
      What caused Telemacus and Hannah's early, and apparently sudden deaths, as well as the death of their child? During the nineteenth century, disease could take several members of a family or a community at once. Scarlet fever, smallpox, yellow fever, cholera, tuberculosis, and other infectious illnesses had to be suffered without the benefit of antibiotics.
      William R. Navey's abstract, Death Notices from the Charlotte Journal, Charlotte, N. C., July 3, 1835-December 7, 1851, lists deaths in the Charlotte area that were reported in one area newspaper, a weekly. In September and October of 1842, thirty-four obituaries for the Charlotte area were printed, compared with ten in July and August, and with five in November and December.28
      At that time another newspaper, The Mecklenburg Jeffersonian, reported "Never within the recollection of our oldest citizens has our village and county been so sickly as during the past two months...near one half of our whole population have been sick."29
      By the time of Hannah's death in December of 1846, the health of Mecklenburg County's citizens was even worse, and people were speaking of "the Great Epidemic of 1846 and 1847." Shortly before her death, the Fayetteville Observer stated that thousands of people, especially in the middle counties of North Carolina had suffered from fevers, the worst situation in twenty years.30
      Telemacus and Hannah's burial place is likely to be Sharon Presbyterian Church, where Telemacus's parents, his brother Hezekiah Calvin Alexander, sister Keziah Kirkpatrick, son Oswald and wife, son James Wallace's wife, and many grandchildren and other relatives and neighbors are buried.31 The old section of the cemetery contains a number of graves with no carved stone. They can be identified as graves by fieldstones that were imbedded in the ground to mark the head and foot of the grave. This was the custom of the time when there was no money to pay a stonecarver.

      1850 United States Federal Census
      HH #1304:
      Name: Wallace Alexander (Telemacus & Hannah Alexander's children)
      Age: 25
      Estimated Birth Year: abt 1825
      Birth Place: North Carolina
      Gender: Male
      Home in 1850: Providence, Mecklenburg, North Carolina
      Family Number: 1304
      Household Members:
      Name Age
      Wallace Alexander 25 (James Wallace)
      John Alexander 22 (John S.)
      Washington Alexander 22 (Silas Washington)
      William Alexander 20 (William H.)
      Columbus Alexander 17 (Ulyses Columbus)
      Osborne Alexander 13 (Oswald)
      Martha Alexander 27 (Martha H.)
      Prudence Alexander 19
      Mary Alexander 12 (Mary S.)
      (Jane Rankin is married and living elsewhere)

      Civil War Prisoner of War Records, 1861-1865
      Name: Telemacus C Alexander
      Side: Confederate
      Roll: M598_114
      Roll Title: Selected Records of the War Department Relating to Confederate Prisoners of War, 1861-1865

      Telemacus (Telemachus, Telemarcus) Alexander was born September 1, 1795, the second child of Silas and Mary Alexander of McAlpine Creek in Mecklenburg County. He had six brothers and two sisters. His grandparents were Hezekiah and Mary Sample Alexander, remembered for their construction of a lasting stone house and for Hezekiah's political activities during the American Revolution.
      Telemacus was undoubtedly educated as other boys from Mecklenburg families of "Scotch-Irish" origin were in the days when the United States was a new country. His teacher would have been Reverend James Wallis, minister of Providence Presbyterian Church and principal of Providence Academy, which was described as a "classical school." Latin and Greek language and literature were an essential part of a proper education in early America. Silas named his second child for a character in an ancient Greek story called The Odyssey, by Homer. He was the son of King Odysseus, and he helped his father defeat his rivals.
      As a young man, Telemacus served in the War of 1812 in the Second Regiment of the Mecklenburg County Detached Militia in 1814, under Major General Montford Stokes.
      Telemacus married Hannah Smith around 1819, when he was 24 years old. The 1820 census shows Tellemarcus (sic) Alexander living in Mecklenburg County in a household of four persons, one of whom, presumably him, as head of household, is listed as "engaged in agriculture." One free white female between 16 and 26 years of age, presumably his wife Hannah, is listed, which would place her birth date between 1794 and 1804. One female under 10 is listed, who could be their daughter, Jane, who was born in the census year.
      One male slave between 14 and 26 years old is listed in the household in 1820, as well. In the tax lists for 1823 and 1824, white men between the ages of 21 and 50 are listed by the militia company to which they belong. Telemacus is listed under Captain Stephen Manson, with 44 acres of land, and in 1824, one black person between the ages of 12 and 50.7
      The ages, genders, and number of Telemacus and Hannah's children in 1830 correspond exactly to those of "Marcus Alexander" listed in the 1830 census, below Silas, Hezekiah, and William, Telemacus's brothers who lived near him. Marcus S. Alexander appears higher up the page. If this is another misspelling of Telemacus's name, it indicates that the family still resided in the Sharon community, consistent with church records, and that they no longer owned slaves.
      Telemacus served jury duty on a regular basis between 1826 and 1840. Court was held for one week beginning on the fourth Monday in February, May, August, and November. Wills and deeds were executed then, as well as criminal and civil trials. The court records show that in 1830, Telemacus and Hannah sold land to William Sample. In 1837, Telemacus and Isaac Campbell sold 60 acres to Elam Harrison, and in 1838, Telemacus and his wife sold land to Richard Tradinick. In addition, in 1830, Alexander Wallace and his wife Prudence sold 44 1/2 acres on McAlpine Creek, which were described as adjacent to James Willson (sic) and Hannah (Smith) Alexander. Earlier, in 1825, a Margaret Smith sold 25 acres on the north side of McAlpine Creek to James Wilson. The deed was witnessed by Telemacus Alexander and Keziah Alexander. Telemacus had a sister named Keziah. (His Aunt Keziah died circa 1821.)
      The 1840 census lists Telemacus Alexander with a household of 12 persons. One person is still counted as employed in agriculture, and no slaves are listed.
      Telemacus is listed as a farmer in census records. Hannah bore a child about every two years beginning in 1820. The whole family were members of Sharon Presbyterian Church, where Telemacus was ordained as a ruling elder in August of 1839. Their farm was apparently located near the church, and the family's names appear repeatedly in the churches' records. They raised sheep and there was a loom in their household, which most likely was used by Hannah to produce cloth for clothing and household furnishings. Telemacus owned blacksmith tools, which he may have used to earn income as well as to repair tools and wagons on the farm. In 1842 they had planks, bricks, and shingles which may have been intended for a house for the family. They were in their forties, had eleven children, a substantial number of loans and outstanding debts, and a cotton crop in the field, when Telemacus suddenly died.
      An obituary in the Charlotte Journal states pathetically that Telemacus left "a wife and eleven children, most of them small, to mourn a loss to them irreparable." The youngest of the ten known children, Mary, was five years old, and the eleventh child must have been an infant.
      Estate records show that he died leaving a number of debts that had to be settled. Most of the livestock and all the tools were sold, along with the household furniture, the loom, and the building materials. As a widow's allowance for one year's support, Hannah was allowed to keep one cow; one heifer; five head of sheep; five shoats (young hogs or pigs); 200 bushels of corn; fodder, shucks, and straw; five head of hogs; 10 pounds of wool; and one lot of leather. Telemacus's brother Silas settled the estate.
      Less than two years later, in April of 1844, C. T. Alexander was appointed temporary guardian of seven of the children, and one year later, Silas was appointed guardian of "the infant heirs" of Telemachus Alexander, indicating that Hannah was incapacitated.
      Hannah's burden of misfortune during this period may have included the death of a child. The 1840 census lists ten children, while her husband's obituary mentions eleven. Sharon Church records show the death of Hannah Alexander occuring only four years after her husband, on December 5, 1846.
      In the 1850 Census, under Providence District of Mecklenburg County, nine of the children are listed as living together on a farm without their parents. The Providence district included the area around Sharon Presbyterian Church, which at that time was outside the town of Charlotte. James Wallace, who was 26 years old, the twins, who were 24, and William, who was 22, were listed as farmers by occupation, on a farm which they owned, with a value of $500.26 The oldest daughter, Jane, was about thirty years old and was married and living with her husband.
      What caused Telemacus and Hannah's early, and apparently sudden deaths, as well as the death of their child? During the nineteenth century, disease could take several members of a family or a community at once. Scarlet fever, smallpox, yellow fever, cholera, tuberculosis, and other infectious illnesses had to be suffered without the benefit of antibiotics.
      William R. Navey's abstract, Death Notices from the Charlotte Journal, Charlotte, N. C., July 3, 1835-December 7, 1851, lists deaths in the Charlotte area that were reported in one area newspaper, a weekly. In September and October of 1842, thirty-four obituaries for the Charlotte area were printed, compared with ten in July and August, and with five in November and December.
      At that time another newspaper, The Mecklenburg Jeffersonian, reported "Never within the recollection of our oldest citizens has our village and county been so sickly as during the past two months...near one half of our whole population have been sick."
      By the time of Hannah's death in December of 1846, the health of Mecklenburg County's citizens was even worse, and people were speaking of "the Great Epidemic of 1846 and 1847." Shortly before her death, the Fayetteville Observer stated that thousands of people, especially in the middle counties of North Carolina had suffered from fevers, the worst situation in twenty years.
      Telemacus and Hannah's burial place is likely to be Sharon Presbyterian Church, where Telemacus's parents, his brother Hezekiah Calvin Alexander, sister Keziah Kirkpatrick, son Oswald and wife, son James Wallace's wife, and many grandchildren and other relatives and neighbors are buried. The old section of the cemetery contains a number of graves with no carved stone. They can be identified as graves by fieldstones that were imbedded in the ground to mark the head and foot of the grave. This was the custom of the time when there was no money to pay a stonecarver.
      (Source: http://home.earthlink.net/~glendaalex/telemacus.htm)