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Cross - Love - Culpepper - Herron - Mordecai - Shelby - Cobb

Col. William Ball, I

Male Abt 1615 - 1680  (~ 65 years)


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  • Name William Ball 
    Prefix Col. 
    Suffix
    Born Abt 1615  Barkham Manor, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died Nov 1680  Millenbeck, Lancaster Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I132  MyTree
    Last Modified 1 Dec 2014 

    Father William Ball, the Immigrant,   b. 1573, Whitshire, Millenbeck Co., England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Nov 1647, New Haven, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Mother Alice Waltham,   b. 1573, Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married Abt 1605  Wiltshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F4664  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Hannah Atherold,   b. 1619, Burgh, Stafford Co., England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jun 1695, Millenbeck, Lancaster Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 2 Jul 1638  Berkshire England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Richard Ball,   b. Abt 1639, Barkham Manor, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1677, Baltimore Co., MD Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 38 years)
    +2. William Ball, II,   b. 2 Jan 1641, Lancaster Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Sep 1694, Lancaster Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years)
     3. Edward Ball,   b. 1642, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1724, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years)
    +4. Joseph Ball, I,   b. 24 May 1649, Millenbeck, Lancaster Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jul 1711, Oakley, "Epping Forest", Lancaster Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years)
    +5. Hannah Ball,   b. 12 Mar 1650, Barkham Manor, Barkham, Berkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1694, Millenbeck, Lancaster Co., VA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 43 years)
    Last Modified 17 Jul 2017 
    Family ID F4663  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Abt 1615 - Barkham Manor, Berkshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 2 Jul 1638 - Berkshire England Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 

    • Colonel William Ball 1615-1680 & Hannah Atherold - b: abt 1620-abt 1690)
      Lost his estates under Cromwell persecution; immigrated to Virginia 1650 and built Millenbeck ; Presiding Magistrate of Lancaster Co. son of: Captain William Ball b: bet 1571-1590 in Wiltshire d: 1648 & Elizabeth Tuttle b: Abt. 1590 or Alice Waltham - daughter of: Richard Waltham son of: William Ball (Abt 1580-Abt 1650)
      son of: John Paris Ball (Abt 1540-1628) & (1) Alice Haynes (Abt 1540-Abt 1580) (2) - Agnes Hathoway b: abt 1529 in England or Elizabeth Webb - daughter of: Thomas Webb & Anne Pulleyne (1512? - ?) - son of: William Richmond Webb (1468? - ?) & Dorothy Lymings son of: William Ball (Abt 1510-1550) & Margaret Moody b: 1509 in Workingham, Berkshire, England son of: Robert Ball b: abt 1475 in Barkham, Berkshire, Eng. & Margaret Unknown son of: Lord William Joseph Ball - Lord of the Manor of Barkham b: 1445 in Barkham, Berkshire, England & Elizabeth Celeter b: abt 1454 in Barkham, Berkshire, Eng
      The surname"Ball" is probably a shortened form of "Baldwin" dating from Norman times meaning "one who is bold enough to win in battle".For many generations the Baldwins were Counts of Flanders. The shortened variations of the spelling included "Baell", "Ball",and Balle". John Balle, born 1263 in Norfolk County, England,is one of the earliest recorded but with very little information. The "Mad Preacher of Kent", John Ball, is the most recorded following John Balle. Having great disdain for royalty while preaching "equality among men" and believing no man had the right to set himself as master of others, he was beheaded by Richard II, King of England in 1381.

      VA Genealogies by Rev. Horace Edwin Hayden, page 47, in the notes at
      the bottom is stated:
      "Mrs. Washington's grandfather, Col. William
      Ball was the first of the family who came to VA., and settled near the
      mouth of the Corotomon River. It appears from a memorandum of Joseph
      Ball Esq., that he married in London, the 2nd day of July, 1638, a
      Miss Hannah Atherall, by whom he had Richard who it is supposed died
      an infant, as he is not mentioned in his father's Will; William born
      2nd June 1641; Joseph born the 25th of May, 1649; and Hannah born
      about the middle of March, 1650; but whether they were born in England
      or Virginia, I cannot learn. William the 2nd son of the 1st of that
      name married a Miss Williamson, an Englishwoman, by whom he had
      William, Richard, James, Joseph, George, David, Margaret, Stretchley
      and Samuel.
      Joseph the 3rd son of the 1st William, married Miss Rogers by whom he
      had Joseph, born the 11th of March 1684; Elizabeth who married the
      Rev'd Mr. Carnegie; Hannah who married Mr. Travers; Anne who married
      Col. Edwin Conway; & Easter (sic) who married Mr. Raleigh Chinn; he
      afterwards married Mrs. Washington's mother, by whom he had her, and
      soon afterward died. His Will is dated the 5th of June 1711."

      William Ball of Lincoln’s Inn – living in 1634 – date of death unknown – 1 son, Col. Wm.

      Col. William Ball was the Ball immigrant. He was the great
      grandfather of George Washington. Almost all of these Virginia
      ancestors were members of the House of Burgesses. William was a
      member of the House of Burgesses, 1669-73

      The majority of the earliest ancestors came to VA in the 1630-1650
      era. The Balls were from Lancaster Co., VA. There are a great deal
      of hand written land grants at Virginia Land Office Patents &
      Grants/Northern Neck Grants & Surveys. Much can be found at the Mary
      Ball Washington Library and St. Mary's White Chapel Church. They
      consider Ball descendents to be royality.
      (Source: Ted Kaufman, Dallas, TX 2002)

      I went to Lancaster Co., VA, and the Mary Ball Library, in Oct. of
      2003 and found much information on the Ball line. (MCM)

      Sources:
      "Colonel William Ball of Virginia, The Great-Grandfather of
      Washington" by Earl L. W. Heck, published and sold by Sydney Wm.
      Dutton, 103, Newgate Street, London, E. C.1. MCMXXVIII, (on file at
      National Genealogical Society Library, 4527 17th Street North,
      Arlington, VA)

      "Colonial Virginians and Their Maryland Relatives", by Norma
      Tucker (located at Montgomery County Historical Society, Rockville,
      MD)
      1. Colonel William Ball (1615) and Hannah Atherall (Atherold) Born
      in England and educated in or about London. Evidence shows that he
      was married July 2, 1638, to Miss Hannah Atherall or Atherold, the
      daugher of Thomas Atherold. He probably left England soon after the
      death of King Charles I., about 1650. He had studied law in England,
      and later interpreted the principles of Common Law for fellow Virginia
      colonists. He was a soldier "under Fairfax," and served in the Royal
      Army and took part in the (English) Civil Wars,
      remaining true to the royal standards and serving faithfully under the
      banners of the ill-fated King Charles. He was probably present at the
      battles of Naseby and Marston Moor. When the Royal Army was defeated,
      Colonel Ball lost the greater part of his considerable estates. In
      company with other royalists he fled to Virginia, the most loyal of
      the king's possessions, and last to surrender to Cromwell's authority.
      Colonel William Ball probably had a brother in Virginia. He did
      not apply for a land grant until at least 8 years after arriving in
      1650. It is thought that he was waiting out the bad times at home and
      planned to return with the Stuarts were returned to the throne. He
      seems, however, to have operated a vessel between England and Virginia
      during this time. He first appears in the Colonial records as a
      Merchant, probably a tobacco merchant.
      After 1660, William Ball took an active part in the religious,
      political and social life of Virginia. In 1660 he was a member of a
      court to make a treaty with the Indians
      and to establish a boundary for the occupation of land by the white
      men. He first received the title of Colonel in 1672, the year he was
      the County Lieutenant of Lancaster. If you held such a rank, you may
      have earned is as a member of the General Court of Virginia.
      "This august and aristocratic body was always composed of the class
      known at that time as 'gentlemen,' men of wealth, family and
      influence, and whose official station
      added much to their influence. They, with the Governor, formed the
      executive council, who dispensed the entire patronage of the colony in
      the way of official appointment, at the same time that each individual
      himself was himself commissioned 'Colonel' by royal authority...The
      Governor was Lieutenant-General, the Councilors, Lieutenants of
      Counties with the title of Colonel, and in counties where a Councillor
      resided, some other person was appointed with
      rank of Major." (Introduction to Vo. I. Calendar Papers, by Palmer)
      It is probable that Colonel was not a member of the General Court,
      since his name does not appear as a member of the General Court, but,
      was a Colonel of Foot or Horse and not County Lieutenant. He was
      doubtless Presiding Magistrate and Colonel Commander of the County.
      He served on various committees in Lancaster County from 1675-7. He
      was presiding member of various courts held in Lancaster County.
      On March 28, 1675-6 he and Lieutenant-Colonel John Carter were
      empowered by the General Assembly of Virginia to mobilize men and
      horses to defend the colony against
      Indians. Their leader was Nathaniel Bacon.
      On August 14, 16777, he was present at a meeting to discuss taxes
      being imposed by the General Assembly to put down Bacon's rebellion.
      From 1670 until his death in 1680 he was a member of the Burgesses
      of Lancaster County.
      He eventually became a planter, and on January 18, 1663, received a
      grant of land on Narrrow Neck Creek in Lancaster County. Four years
      (apparently after promotion to
      Major) he received a joint grant of 1600 acres in the Countyof
      Rappahannock on the north side of the river of the same name together
      with Thomas Chetwood. A few months later he
      acquired 300 acres of rich bottom land adjoining the estate of Daniel
      Fox, who later became the Colonel's son-in-law. He built a beautiful
      Georgian mansion on his Lancaster
      County estate, which he named Millenbeck, probably after ome place in
      Warwickshire or Northamptonshire. The estate was held for four
      successive generations by William Balls
      and played a prominent part in Virginia history.
      Colonel Ball was a zealous supporter of the Virginia branch of the
      Church of England. He and John Washington were wardens of Christ
      Church, Lancaster County.
      (Taken from Heck's book)

      Colonel William Ball (1615) and Hannah Atherall (Atherold)
      Born in England and educated in or about London.
      Evidence shows that he was married July 2, 1638, to Miss
      Hannah Atherall or Atherold, the daugher of Thomas Atherold.
      He probably left England soon after the death of King
      Charles I., about 1650. He had studied law in England, and
      later interpreted the principles of Common Law for fellow
      Virginia colonists.
      He was a soldier "under Fairfax," and served in the
      Royal Army and took part in the (English) Civil Wars,
      remaining true to the royal standards and serving
      faithfully under the banners of the ill-fated King Charles.
      He was probably present at the battles of Naseby and Marston
      Moor. When the Royal Army was defeated, Colonel Ball lost
      the greater part of his considerable estates. In company
      with other royalists he fled to Virginia, the most loyal of
      the king's possessions, and last to surrender to Cromwell's
      authority.
      Colonel William Ball probably had a brother in
      Virginia. He did not apply for a land grant until at least
      8 years after arriving in 1650. It is thought that he was
      waiting out the bad times at home and planned to return with
      the Stuarts were returned to the throne. He seems, however,
      to have operated a vessel between England and Virginia
      during this time. He first appears in the Colonial records
      as a Merchant, probably a tobacco merchant.
      After 1660, William Ball took an active part in the
      religious, political and social life of Virginia. In 1660
      he was a member of a court to make a treaty with the Indians
      and to establish a boundary for the occupation of land by
      the white men. He first received the title of Colonel in
      1672, the year he was the County Lieutenant of Lancaster.
      If you held such a rank, you may have earned is as a member
      of the General Court of Virginia.
      "This august and aristocratic body was always composed
      of the class known at that time as 'gentlemen,' men of
      wealth, family and influence, and whose official station
      added much to their influence. They, with the Governor,
      formed the executive council, who dispensed the entire
      patronage of the colony in the way of official appointment,
      at the same time that each individual himself was himself
      commissioned 'Colonel' by royal authority...The Governor was
      Lieutenant-General, the Councilors, Lieutenants of Counties
      with the title of Colonel, and in counties where a
      Councillor resided, some other person was appointed with
      rank of Major." (Introduction to Vo. I. Calendar Papers, by
      Palmer)
      It is probable that Colonel was not a member of the
      General Court, since his name does not appear as a member of
      the General Court, but, was a Colonel of Foot or Horse and
      not County Lieutenant. He was doubtless Presiding
      Magistrate and Colonel Commander of the County. He served
      on various committees in Lancaster County from 1675-7. He
      was presiding member of various courts held in Lancaster
      County.
      On March 28, 1675-6 he and Lieutenant-Colonel John
      Carter were empowered by the General Assembly of Virginia to
      mobilize men and horses to defend the colony against
      Indians. Their leader was Nathaniel Bacon.
      On August 14, 16777, he was present at a meeting to
      discuss taxes being imposed by the General Assembly to put
      down Bacon's rebellion.
      From 1670 until his death in 1680 he was a member of
      the Burgesses of Lancaster County.
      He eventually became a planter, and on January 18,
      1663, received a grant of land on Narrrow Neck Creek in
      Lancaster County. Four years (apparently after promotion to
      Major) he received a joint grant of 1600 acres in the County
      of Rappahannock on the north side of the river of the same
      name together with Thomas Chetwood. A few months later he
      acquired 300 acres of rich bottom land adjoining the estate
      of Daniel Fox, who later became the Colonel's son-in-law.
      He built a beautiful Georgian mansion on his Lancaster
      County estate, which he named Millenbeck, probably after
      some place in Warwickshire or Northamptonshire. The estate
      was held for four successive generations by William Balls
      and played a prominent part in Virginia history.
      Colonel Ball was a zealous supporter of the Virginia
      branch of the Church of England. He and John Washington
      were wardens of Christ Church, Lancaster County.
      (Taken from Heck's book)

      Children of Col. William Ball (1615):
      Captain William Ball (1/2/1641-9/30/1694) and Ms.
      Williamson, Ms. Harris, Ms. Margaret Downman
      Born in England, he inherited Millenbeck. Captain Ball took an active part in the public affairs of Virginia. In 1687 he was appointed to lay off the boundary between Lancaster and Northumberland Counties. He was a Justice in 1680 and at various times from 1682-1688 he was a Burgiss from Lancaster County. (Heck)