Genealogy by Martha

Cross - Love - Culpepper - Herron - Mordecai - Shelby - Cobb

Patrick Knox

Male 1740 - 1780  (40 years)


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  • Name Patrick Knox 
    Born 1740  Belfast, County of Antrim, Ulster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Birth Ulster, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 1780  Lincoln Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Death 20 Jun 1780  Battle of Ramsur's Mill, Lincoln, NC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I3734  MyTree
    Last Modified 19 Jan 2015 

    Family Mary Smith,   b. 1740, NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 1766  Mecklenburg, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Matthew Knox,   b. 1766, Lincoln, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    +2. Hannah Knox,   b. 1767, Lincoln Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Ruth Knox,   b. 1769, Lincoln, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. Jane Knox,   b. 1772, Lincoln, North Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     5. John Knox,   b. 1777, Lincoln Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1860, Mecklenburg Co., NC Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
    Last Modified 17 Jul 2017 
    Family ID F2385  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsDeath - 20 Jun 1780 - Battle of Ramsur's Mill, Lincoln, NC Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • All notes below are from the work of P.R.Bruckner:
      In 2008, Knox-DNA Project results proved a genetic link between descendants of Captain Patrick Knox of North Mecklenburg and descendants of Robert Knox of Lincoln County. In February 2009, results link descendants of Matthew Knox of Steele Creek, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina to both Patrick and Robert.

      The KNOX-DNA project results-to-date place my Patrick in Line No. 1. The Matthew, b. 1803, Pendleton SC [who m. 1828 in Pendleton SC, Belinda Nicholson] has also been placed in this genetic group -- along with Robert Knox, b. 1842, Ireland - d. 1833 Lincoln Co, NC who m. Mary Ewart and William B. Knox, b. abt 1803, SC who m. 1825 in Hancock Co, GA, Hetty Wilkins. How these all connect is still unclear... We do not yet have a participant from John A. P. Knox's line.

      Just one detail I want to clear up re Patrick Knox. Although he could have lived in Tryon/Lincoln at some time before 1779, there is no surviving evidence he ever did.

      Captain Patrick Knox died in Lincoln in 1780 in a Rev War battle, but according to all historical accounts he was "of Mecklenburg." Lincolnton wasn't that far "over the county line" from Patrick's property on the "east side" of the Catawba River documented by a Sept 1779 Deed. I believe his 373 acres was located near Cowan's Ford, probably south of the Power Plant/Dam now on Lake Norman. His estate papers also state he was of Mecklenburg, and the estate was probated in Mecklenburg, so there is no question were he lived immediately prior to his death. (Peggy Bruckner - 30-Sept-2008)

      Patrick Knox is said to have been killed at the Battle of Ramsur's
      Mill, Lincoln Co., NC which took place 20 June 1780.. Source: FTM
      CD524, Sketches of Western North Carolina; Author: C.L Hunter. (It is
      not known when this Patrick was born, but I estimate between
      1720-1740. His burial location is also unknown, but assumed to be
      somewhere in Lincoln Co, NC were his estate was probated.)

      "Now that we have Knox-DNA evidence of Patrick's connection with old Matthew of Steele Creek, I'm keeping an eye out for clues there as well." (Source: Peggy Bruckner - 7-2009)

      In a January 3, 1996 article, written by Ken Brotherton and published
      in the Mecklenburg Gazette, Mr. Brotherton states that Robert's
      "brother, Patrick, was killed" at the Battle of Ramseur's Mill (June
      20, 1780) in Lincolnton, Lincoln Co, NC; (see 1782 Estate of Patrick
      Knox, naming widow Mary and his children: Matthew, Ruth, Jane, James,
      & Hannah.)

      NC Archives - Mecklenburg Original Estate Records Box CR.065.508.146:
      Estate Papers of Patrick Knox: ABSTRACT: April Court Session 1782 -
      "I hereby certify that Mary Knox, Admr of Patrick Knox Dec'd an
      Inventory & Amount of sales of said Estate..." Test - Isaac Alexander,
      Cmt July Session 1800 - Settlement of Patrick Knoxes Estate by Alison
      Knox "Accounts Current & Settlement of Estate of Patrick Knox Dec'd
      who was killed in June 1780, Mary Knox, Relict as Administratrux" [1]
      The Full Amount of Sales as Returned to Court in 1782 amounting to...
      ...to an additional return by her Husband Alison Knox in 1786....
      ...by the Following vouchers - viz - ...John Duckworth...L0.15.8
      ...David Wilson's note acct..3.8.0 ...Thomas Davidson's acct..3.12.0
      ...Clerkes Certificate...1.9.0 ...Receipts for Taxes...5.18.3 ...Draw
      Back monies...9.0.0 ...January 20, 1783 admintr paid to the Heires...
      ...Interest upon the above ...untill 20 January 1787... ...Interest
      thereon until 20 January 1795... ...Mathew Knoxes Rect for 3.0.0...
      ...Mathew Knoxes Rect for 12.5.2... ...Samuel Wilson's Rect for
      68.11.0 ...Saml Wilson Rect for 45.0.0 ...Alowance made the Admr at
      July Term 1800... July 22, 1800 "We the subscribers as a Committe of
      Court have examined & admited the foregoing Vouchers and after
      Deducting the amount of said vouchers from the amount of sailes of
      said estate Leaves a Ballance of L4.0.11 in the Hands of hte
      administrator all of which is Submitted to Court" ....Conners JP Jno
      Harris JP

      Oct 27th, 1785 - Guardian Bond - "Allison Knox Guardian of the
      aforesaid Hannah Knox" [signed by Alison Knox and James Knox]

      March 1, 1786 - Administrator "Allison Knox now married to relict"
      [signs Alison Knox]

      April 28, 1794 - Guardian Bond - "Saml Wilson appointed guardian of
      Patrick Knoxes minor children John & Jane Knox" (signed by Samuel
      Wilson and James Curry; witness Isaac Alexander )

      March 2, 1795 - Court Proceeding regarding an "error" in the [Jan 31,
      1792 ] sale of a Waggon purchased by James Knox from the estate of
      Patrick Knox "evidently was proved on trial on the 2nd March 1795
      before Col. James Johnston & Isaac Alexander as arbitrators by the
      Oath of Several Creditable Witnesses who were present at the said
      sales & knew and believed said Admin. & Mary Knox then & there did
      enter into a special agreement with said James Knox that he should
      have the waggon at his former bid...and that she and her brother Smith
      then urged him the said James to bid the said Waggon off to himself
      and not suffer[?] it _____into the hands of those poor ___ persons who
      were then bidding for it, to the great injury of herself and orphant
      children, to which agreement the said James complied, bid it off at
      L36.10.0 gave his said note publicly with the other people...yet the
      Estate of said James Knox has got relief in the premises to the said
      amount of L7 hard, by his Executors Hugh Terrence & Jno Sharpe on the
      said 2 March 1795 before James Johnston & Isaac? Alexander, when there
      was a full investigation of the whole matter, with evidence ___And
      Samuel Willson present, who had said note assigned to him, as
      Guardian of 2 of the Heirs of said Patrick Knox & married to a third
      therefore he draws now three fourths of the Neat [sic Net] proceeds
      of said Estate...'

      June 7, 1800 - "Admin. for Schooling the Orphans of Decd Patrick Knox"
      [Alison Knox accounting of money paid for schooling of children]: 1782
      - Hannah & Matthew "9 months each"...1785, 1786, 1787 - [9] "three
      years in the whole" for Ruth John & Jean [Jane?]Knox "at different
      times"..."note Hannah & Matthew went to school some in the above three
      years"

      Estate Papers of Patrick Knox
      ABSTRACT:
      April Court Session 1782 - "I hereby certify that Mary Knox, Admr of
      Patrick Knox Dec'd an Inventory & Amount of sales of said Estate..."
      Test - Isaac Alexander, Cmt

      July Session 1800 - Settlement of Patrick Knoxes Estate by Alison Knox
      "Accounts Current & Settlement of Estate of Patrick Knox Dec'd who was
      kiled in June 1780, Mary Knox, Relict as Administratrux" [1]
      The Full Amount of Sales as Returned to Court in 1782 amounting to...
      ...to an additional return by her Husband Alison Knox in 1786....
      ...by the Following vouchers - viz -
      ...John Duckworth...L0.15.8
      ...David Wilson's note acct..3.8.0
      ...Thomas Davidson's acct..3.12.0
      ...Clerkes Certificate...1.9.0
      ...Receipts for Taxes...5.18.3
      ...Draw Back monies...9.0.0
      ...January 20, 1783 admintr paid to the Heires...
      ...Interest upon the above ...untill 20 January 1787...
      ...Interest thereon until 20 January 1795...
      ...Mathew Knoxes Rect for 3.0.0...
      ...Mathew Knoxes Rect for 12.5.2...
      ...Samuel Wilson's Rect for 68.11.0
      ...Saml Wilson Rect for 45.0.0
      ...Alowance made the Admr at July Term 1800...

      July 22, 1800
      "We the subscribers as a Committe of Court have examined & admited the
      foregoing Vouchers and after Deducting the amount of said vouchers
      from the amount of sailes of said estate Leaves a Ballance of L4.0.11
      in the Hands of hte administrator all of which is Submitted to Court"
      ....Conners JP
      Jno Harris JP

      The North Carolina Booklet (on NCGENWEB Site) Vol. IX
      The History of Lincoln County By Alfred Nixon, page 6, 7:
      "THE BATTLE OF RAMSOUR'S MILL"
      The Tories were embodied at Ramsour's Mill through the efforts of
      Lieut.-Col. John Moore and Maj. Nicholas Welch. These officers left
      the victorious British on the march from Charleston and arrived at
      their homes early in June, 1780. Moses Moore, the father of Colonel
      Moore, was a native of Carlyle, England, married a Miss Winston, near
      Jamestown, Virginia, and came to this section with the pioneers.
      Esther, a sister of Colonel Moore, married Joshua Roberts, a patriot
      soldier. The late Capt. John H. Roberts, a grandson, lived on the
      Moore homestead. It is situate on Indian Creek, eight miles southwest
      of Ramsour's Mill. Colonel Moore was an active partisan throughout the
      Revolution. Major Welch was a son of John Welch, and was reared next
      neighbor to Colonel Moore on Indian Creek. He was of Scottish descent,
      of great fluency of speech and fine persuasive power. They bore
      English commissions, were arrayed in splendid official equipments and
      made lavish display of British gold. By the twentieth of June, these
      zealous loyalists collected at Ramsour's Mill a force of 1,300 Tories,
      and were actively engaged in their organization and drill preparatory
      to marching them to unite with the British in South Carolina. They
      occupied a well-chosen and advantageous position for offense and
      defense. It was on a high ridge that slopes three hundred yards to the
      mill and Clarke's Creek on the west and the same distance to a branch
      on the east.

      Col. Francis Locke collected a force of Rowan and Mecklenburg militia
      to engage the Tories. His detachments met at Mountain Creek, sixteen
      miles from Ramsour's on Monday, the 19th, and when united amounted to
      four hundred men. They marched at once to the assault of the Tory
      position. At dawn of day on the morning of the 20th, in two miles of
      Ramsour's, they were met by Adam Reep, a noted scout, with a few
      picked men from the vicinity of the camp, who detailed to Colonel
      Locke the position of the enemy, and the plan of attack was formed.
      The mounted men under Captains McDowell, Brandon, and Falls, marching
      slowly were to follow the road due west to the camp, and not attack
      until the footmen under Colonel Locke could detour to the south, and
      reach the foot of the hill along the Tuckaseegee road, and make a
      simultaneous assault. They proceeded without other organization or
      order, it being left to the officers to be governed by circumstances
      when they reached the enemy.

      The mounted men came upon the Tory picket some distance from the camp,
      were fired upon, charged the Tory camp, but recoiled from their deadly
      fire. The firing hurried Colonel Locke into action, a like volley
      felled many of his men, and they likewise retired. The Tories, seeing
      the effect of their fire, came down the hill and were in fair view.
      The Whigs renewed the action, which soon became general and obstinate
      on both sides. In about an hour the Tories began to fall back to their
      original position on the ridge, and a little beyond its summit, to
      shield a part of their bodies from the destructive fire of the Whigs,
      who were fairly exposed to their fire. In this situation the Tory fire
      became so effective the Whigs fell back to the bushes near the branch;
      and the Tories, leaving their safe position, pursued half way down the
      hill. At this moment Captain Hardin led a company of Whigs into the
      field from the south and poured a galling fire into the right flank of
      the Tories. Some of the Whigs obliqued to the right, and turned the
      left flank of the Tories; while Captain Sharpe led a few men beyond
      the crest of the ridge, and, advancing from tree to tree, with
      unerring aim picked off the enemy's officers and men, and hastened the
      termination of the conflict. The action now became close and warm. The
      combatants mixed together, and having no bayonets, struck at each
      other with the butts of their guns. When the Whigs reached the summit
      they saw the Tories collected beyond the creek, with a white flag
      flying. Fifty Tories, unable to make the bridge, were taken prisoners.
      Those beyond soon di spersed and made their escape. One-fourth of the
      Tories were unarmed, and they with a few others retired at the
      commencement of the battle.

      Seventy men, including the five Whig and four Tory captains, lay dead
      on the field, and more than two hundred were wounded, the loss on each
      side being about equal. In this contest, armed with the deadly rifle,
      blood relatives and familiar acquaintances and near neighbors fought
      in the opposing ranks, and as the smoke of the battle occasionally
      cleared away recognized each other in the conflict.

      THE BATTLE OF RAMSAUR'S MILL
      20 Jun 178O, By William Graham:
      Major on Staff of Adjutant General of North Carolina)
      ...Colonel James Johnston, who lived in Tryon (Gaston) County near
      Toole's Ford, and who had joined Major Wilson when he crossed the
      river, was dispatched to inform General Rutherford of their action.
      Late in the evening they marched down the south side of Anderson's
      Mountain, and taking the "State" Road, stopped at the Mountain Spring
      to arrange a plan of battle. It was agreed that Brandon's, Fall's and
      McDowell's men, being mounted, should open the attack, the footmen to
      follow, and every man, without awaiting orders, govern himself as
      developments might make necessary as the fight proceeded...
      ...The troops engaged, except Reep of Lincoln, and Major Wilson,
      Captains Knox and Smith of Mecklenburg, were from (what to 1777 had
      been) Rowan County. The officers' surnames were found among the
      militia officers of the county in the proceedings of the "Committee of
      Safety," of which many of them were members. Captain John Hardin's
      beat was along Lord Granville's line from Silver Creek in Burke to
      South Fork, and from these. two points to the Catawba River. Captain
      Joseph Dobson was within its bounds. Much the largest portion of the
      troops was from what is now Iredell County. Captain John Sloan was
      from Fourth Creek. I do not think all who are mentioned as captains
      held that position at this time; some may have been prior to and some
      became so afterward. No account was written until forty years had
      elapsed. There seems to have been but few commands given in the
      engagement; officers and privates acted as occasion required, and both
      suffered severely....

      From the NC Archives- Mecklenburg Original Estate Records Box
      CR.065.508.146:

      Estate Papers of Patrick Knox

      Abstract:

      April Court Session 1782 - Patrick Knox "kiled in June 1780, Mary
      Knox, Relict as Administratrux"

      Oct[?] 9[?], 1785 - Guardian Bond - "Allison Knox Guardian of the
      aforesaid Hannah Knox" [signed by Alison Knox and James Knox]

      March 1, 1786 - Administrator "Allison Knox now married to relict"
      [signs Alison Knox]

      April 28, 1794 - Guardian Bond - "Saml Wilson appointed guardian of
      Patrick Knoxes minor children John & Jane Knox" [signed by Samuel
      Wilson and James Curry; witness Isaac Alexander]

      June 7, 1800 - "Admin. for Schooling the Orphans of Decd Patrick Knox"
      [Alison Knox accounting of money paid for schooling of children]: 1782
      - Hannah & Matthew "9 months each" 1785, 1786, 1787 - "three years in
      the whole" for Ruth John & Jean [Jane?]Knox "at different
      times"..."note Hannah & Matthew went to school some in the above three
      years"







      -- MERGED NOTE ------------